Why a Strong Thesis Statement is Important For an Essay

Why a Strong Thesis Statement is Important For an Essay

Strong Thesis Statement

A thesis statement is a single sentence that provides a summary of the ideas discussed within the paper. The statement often comes at the end of the first paragraph and states the major points that the writer wishes to convey throughout the paper. Establishing the statement helps the writer in structuring the rest of the essay around the concepts under discussion. Within the academic setting, understanding the importance of a thesis and how to develop a strong statement is necessary considering the vast amount of essays one will need to write. Essentially, the thesis is an imperative element that defines a strong essay while providing a unified direction.

Importance of a strong thesis

A strong thesis statement helps in creating a focus for the main ideas within the essay. It is necessary that a writer defines the main idea of the paper in few sentences that will create a clear idea for the paper. The implication is that the thesis helps the paper remain organized and hence there will be a clear structure from the beginning to the end. A poorly written thesis statement means that the writer will have a difficult time organizing and focusing his points. The outcomes will be an ineffectively structured essay without clear ideas and hence the inability to argue out the intended points.

A strong thesis statement is also critical in helping the reader understand and follow the main ideas of the essay. With the thesis coming at the end of the introduction, this means that it sets the reader up for the rest of the paper. Based on what the writer presents in the thesis statement, the reader expects to find the evidence within the body. The statement should also be concise as it helps in quick comprehension of the major issues (Faryadi, 2018). The reader is already aware of what to expect in the paper. The implication is that a strong thesis statement will present a clearly structured paper that is less cumbersome to read.

Developing a strong thesis statement

In developing a strong thesis statement for an essay, the writer needs to follow several steps as outlined below.

Focus on one topic– a strong thesis statement begins with the identification of the topic that the writer intends to deal with. Focusing on one topic is pertinent as it limits the writer from wandering around. Having a strong essay depends on how well the writer argues out the points and this can only take place within the confines of a narrow topic.

Defining the research question– after topic selection, the writer should pose the research question that the essay seeks to answer. The research question becomes a guide on the areas that the writer should focus on.

Brainstorming the ideas– a strong thesis statement is only effective if the writer can defend it with evidence. Brainstorming involves considering the arguments that will be part of the paper. The step also involves the consideration of the counterarguments that are likely to emerge considering the selected topic. After brainstorming different ideas, one should come up with a concise answer to the research question.

Crafting the thesis statement- considering all the previous steps, the writer should then craft a thesis statement in one or two sentences. The thesis should capture the answer to the research question as well as the counterargument. It is important to revise the thesis statement in ensuring that it captures all the elements that the essay will discuss.

Developing a strong thesis statement is the most important part of the writing process. It delineates the points that the writer intends to argue out in the paper and helps in organizing a structured essay. For the reader, it highlights the expectations within the essay and the expected conclusions.

 

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Reference

Faryadi, Q. (2018). PhD Thesis Writing Process: A Systematic Approach—How to Write Your Introduction. Creative Education, 9, 2534-2545. https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED590321.pdf