What are the three basic parts of a position paper?

What are the three basic parts of a position paper?

What are the three basic parts of a position paper? a position paper presents one side of an arguable opinion about an issue. The
goal of a position paper is to convince the audience that your opinion is valid and defensible.
Ideas that you are considering need to be carefully examined in choosing a topic,
developing your argument, and organizing your paper. It is very important to ensure that
you are addressing all sides of the issue and presenting it in a manner that is easy for your
audience to understand. Your job is to take one side of the argument and persuade your
audience that you have well-founded knowledge of the topic being presented. It is
important to support your argument with evidence to ensure the validity of your claims, as
well as to refute the counterclaims to show that you are well informed about both sides.
Organization

WRITING A POSITION PAPER

What are the three basic parts of a position paper?
Sample Outline
I. Introduction
___A. Introduce the topic
___B. Provide background on the topic to explain why it is important
___C. Assert the thesis (your view of the issue). More on thesis statements can be
found below.
Your introduction has a dual purpose: to indicate both the topic and your approach to
it (your thesis statement), and to arouse your reader’s interest in what you have to
say. One effective way of introducing a topic is to place it in context – to supply a
kind of backdrop that will put it in perspective. You should discuss the area into
which your topic fits, and then gradually lead into your specific field of discussion
(re: your thesis statement).
II. Counter Argument
___A. Summarize the counterclaims
___B. Provide supporting information for counterclaims
___C. Refute the counterclaims
___D. Give evidence for argument
You can generate counterarguments by asking yourself what someone who disagrees
with you might say about each of the points you’ve made or about your position as a
whole. Once you have thought up some counterarguments, consider how you will
respond to them–will you concede that your opponent has a point but explain why
your audience should nonetheless accept your argument? Will you reject the
counterargument and explain why it is mistaken? Either way, you will want to leave
your reader with a sense that your argument is stronger than opposing arguments.
When you are summarizing opposing arguments, be charitable. Present each
argument fairly and objectively, rather than trying to make it look foolish. You want
to show that you have seriously considered the many sides of the issue, and that you
are not simply attacking or mocking your opponents.
It is usually better to consider one or two serious counterarguments in some depth,
rather than to give a long but superficial list of many different counterarguments and
replies.
Be sure that your reply is consistent with your original argument. If considering a
counterargument changes your position, you will need to go back and revise your
original argument accordingly.
III. Your Argument
___A. Assert point #1 of your claims
_____1. Give your educated and informed opinion
_____2. Provide support/proof using more than one source (preferably three)
___B. Assert point #2 of your claims
_____1. Give your educated and informed opinion
_____2. Provide support/proof using more than one source (preferably three)
___C. Assert point #3 of your claims
_____1. Give your educated and informed opinion
_____2. Provide support/proof using more than one source (preferably three)
You may have more than 3 overall points to your argument, but you should
not have fewer.
IV. Conclusion
___A. Restate your argument
___B. Provide a plan of action but do not introduce new information
The simplest and most basic conclusion is one that restates the thesis in different
words and then discusses its implications.

Stating Your Thesis STatement

A thesis is a one-sentence statement about your topic. It’s an assertion about your
topic, something you claim to be true. Notice that a topic alone makes no such
claim; it merely defines an area to be covered. To make your topic into a thesis
statement, you need to make a claim about it, make it into a sentence. Look back
over your materials–brainstorms, investigative notes, etc.–and think about what
you believe to be true. Think about what your readers want or need to know. Then
write a sentence, preferably at this point, a simple one, stating what will be the
central idea of your paper. The result should look something like this:
Original Subject: an important issue in my major field
Focused Topic: media technology education for communication majors
Thesis: Theories of media technology deserve a more prominent place in this University’s
Communication program
Or if your investigations led you to a different belief:
Thesis: Communication majors at this University receive a solid background in
theories of media technology
It’s always good to have a thesis you can believe in.
Notice, though, that a sentence stating an obvious and indisputable truth
won’t work as a thesis:
Thesis: This University has a Communication major.
That’s a complete sentence, and it asserts something to be true, but as a thesis it’s a
dead end. It’s a statement of fact, pure and simple, and requires little or nothing
added. A good thesis asks to have more said about it. It demands some
proof. Your job is to show your reader that your thesis is true.