Samsung diversifies on the flash memory market

Samsung diversifies on the flash memory market

Samsung diversifies on the flash memory market

InstructionsHideCase 1 Samsung diversifies on the flash memory market – Answer all the questions with evidence from the case and you can use the textbook.

Q1. How did Samsung achieve economies of scope in developing their NAND flash memory technology?

Q2. How might the rest of the industry respond to the dominant position Samsung now holds in NAND flash memory technology?

Q3. What benefits did Samsung receive due to the diversification strategy to flash memory products?

Q4. What are the different levels of diversification firms can pursue by using different corporate level strategies? Write comprehensive answer with examples (2 points)

Samsung diversifies on the flash memory market

Samsung looks to change with $116bn bet on logic chips

Samsung diversifies on the flash memory market

Case 2: Nissan and Renault – a horizontal complementary strategic alliance case – Answer all the questions

Q1. Why is the Nissan and Renault case a good example of a horizontal complementary strategic alliance? Discuss the characteristics , success and failure factors of a strategic alliance.

Q2. What are the main challenges confronting this alliance in the ever changing automobile sector?

Q3. How did Renault-Nissan Alliance created synergy between them that supports them to neutral decision making so that both companies satisfied.

Q4. Describe two of the international business strategies you learn and what are the potential success and failure factors? (2 points)

Samsung chips away at Intel lead

 

Intel dominates the market for computer processors (CPUs) – its Intel Inside sticker is on around 80 percent of the world’s PCs – but future growth is in mobile application processors.

Demand for these is seen rising around 40 percent annually through 2014, according to Nomura research, while growth in PC processors will be in single digits. By 2015, the global market for application processors (AP) will have jumped fourfold to $33 billion, while the CPU market will shrink by more than a tenth to $34 billion, according to NH Investment & Securities.