Sample grant paper

Sample grant paper

Sample grant paper

We propose to explore whether total energy density, frequency of consumption, and portion sizes of high-energy-dense foods contribute to body weight, body fatness, and related chronic conditions within a nationally representative sample of US adults using the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) (5) data.  This research would logically extend previous research activities by our group targeting dietary energy density and the consumption of fruits and vegetables, and legumes for purposes of improving diet quality, controlling weight, and cancer prevention and control.

 

Using a nationally representative sample of US adults, our specific aims are to:

 

Aim 1.  Determine whether the consumption of an energy-dense diet is positively associated with established risk factors for cancer including weight/BMI, waist circumference, and biomarkers of insulin insensitivity and inflammation.

Our hypothesis is that after controlling for important confounders such as age, gender, race, and physical activity, consumption of high-energy-dense diets will be positively associated with overweight and body fatness and with increased fasting levels of plasma insulin, glucose, and C-reactive protein. 

 

Aim 2.  Establish whether the proportion of total energy intake contributed by high-energy-dense foods is positively associated with established risk factors for cancer including weight/BMI, waist circumference and biomarkers of insulin insensitivity and inflammation.

Our hypothesis is that after adjustment for relevant confounders, proportionally higher consumption of high-energy-dense foods will be positively associated with overweight and larger waist circumferences and with increased fasting levels of the aforementioned biomarkers.

 

  1. Identify whether portion size of high-energy-dense foods is an important contributor to weight/BMI, waist circumference and biomarkers of insulin sensitivity and inflammation.

Our hypothesis is that intake of larger portions of high-energy-dense foods is positively associated with overweight, waist circumference and biomarkers of insulin sensitivity and inflammation after controlling for confounders. 

 

To our knowledge, our proposed research will be the first of it’s kind to be conducted using the most recently available NHANES nutrition data.  The results will provide important information for the implementation of the WCRF/AICR cancer prevention recommendations including guidance for scientists interested in the development of dietary interventions targeting weight and related conditions.