Milwaukee and Abu Zaby and Urbanization

Milwaukee and Abu Zaby.

Profiling the World’s Largest Urban Agglomerations: Morphology
This assignment asks you to revise and significantly expand on the virtual exploration you made of your cities in the last discussion. You will not be collecting any more data for the spreadsheet this time around, but you will be spending considerably more time reexamining the layout of your city.

Begin by repeating the third step from Discussion 2, and this time spend considerably more time virtually exploring your two cities via Google Maps (Links to an external site.), Google Earth, and/or similar collections of satellite imagery and online mapping. As directed before, develop a sense of the spatial extent of your agglomerations, paying attention both to the natural setting of your city—is it on a river, a coastline, an island, a peninsula, in the middle of a flat plain, surrounded by mountains?—and to the density of roads, buildings, and other structures. Vary your perspective by zooming in and out. While you are zoomed out, look for broad patterns, especially indications of how the city is connected to the rest of the world by water, land, and/or air. While you are zoomed in, look for shadows on the ground to help you identify where tall buildings might be clustered—strong indication of some sort of “downtown” business district—and also take advantage of tools such as Google’s Street View (Links to an external site.) to virtually drop yourself down onto the city’s sidewalks for a photographic tour of its street-side landscapes.

Milwaukee and Abu Zaby

While you are zoomed in, look for shadows on the ground to help you identify where tall buildings might be clustered—strong indication of some sort of “downtown” business district—and also take advantage of tools such as Google’s Street View (Links to an external site.) to virtually drop yourself down onto the city’s sidewalks for a photographic tour of its street-side landscapes.