Explanatory Synthesis

Sania Arsala Professor Anthony Pino English 101A 4 April 2013 The Source of Magic: Explanatory Synthesis Although there are many fairy tales, “Cinderella” is a fairly well-known magical story enjoyed and told by arguably thousands of cultures around the world. In the typical “Cinderella” fairy tale, the Fairy Godmother magically appears and transforms Cinderella from her destitute state into a beautiful princess who lives happily ever after with her Prince Charming. There are many versions of “Cinderella” from the different cultures that have embedded magic into the fairy tale.
The source of that magic and tests differs in the ways it unites the Cinderella characters with her Prince Charming characters. Amongst the plethora of different cultures’ versions of “Cinderella,” Walt Disney uses the most common type of fairy tale magic. Once the stepsisters go to the ball, Cinderella is sobbing because she wants to go too. Her Fairy Godmother suddenly appears and helps Cinderella prepare for the ball. She magically turns a pumpkin into a coach, mice into horses, and the dog into a footman.
One last important magic spell is left to cast, and as the Fairy Godmother waves her magic wand and sings, “Salaga doola, Menchicka boola, Bibbidi bobbidi boo! ” Cinderella’s ragged clothes turn into a beautiful gown. However, Cinderella is warned by the Fairy Godmother that she has to leave the ball before the clock strikes midnight because the spell will break and everything will turn back into its original form. Cinderella must take heed in what Fairy Godmother told her or consequences may follow.

With the help of the Fairy Godmother, Cinderella is able to go to the ball, and she falls in love with the prince. Prince Charming is also madly in love with her and goes from house to house looking for her. Because of the magical transformation of Cinderella’s appearance, the prince’s only hope to find his princess is by making every girl try on the glass shoe Cinderella left behind at the ball. The use of magic allows the story to end happily. However, the Fairy Godmother does not appear in some of the other cultures’ “Cinderella” stories; she is not the source of magic.
In the Native American version of Cinderella, “Oochigeaskw, The Rough-Faced Girl,” no magic used to find her prince until after she meets the Invisible One. Unlike in Disney’s version, her own two malicious sisters physically torture Oochigeaskw: “The wicked sister would burn her hands and feet with hot cinders, and she was covered with scars from this treatment” (246). Without any help from anyone, Oochigeaskw decides to design a dress for herself out of sheets of birch bark.
Even though Oochigeaskw does not look as beautiful as the Disney Cinderella, her inner beauty and ambition make her successful in her mission without the need of a fairy godmother to unite her with the Invisible One. When the Invisible One’s sister asks Oochigeaskw if she can see him, she responds, “I do indeed—and he is wonderful! ” (247). With that being said, the Invisible One’s sister takes her home and bathes her. Magically, her scars disappear from her innocent body, her hair looks rich and silky, and her eyes shine like stars.
Oochigeaskw looks breathtakingly beautiful and becomes the Invisible One’s beloved wife. Oochigeaskw’s patience and diligence help her achieve what she wants, the Invisible One. The source of magic in this fairy tale is the Invisible One’s sister. Although the sister reveals Oochigeaskw’s true beauty by bathing her, this happens only after Oochigeaskw passes the pivotal test. Indeed, every “Cinderella” story has unique magic and hardships in it, but the source of magic and test is different in each version.
Whether it is a Fairy Godmother or the Invisible One’s sister, the fairy tale is neither complete nor successful without their presence. Their magic and test arise questions from readers whether “Cinderella” and prince charming will ever reunite, yet they still have hope for a “happily-ever-after” ending. One of the the significant difference between the two fairy tales is that Disney Cinderella hides her real self and beauty to win the prince’s love rather Oochigeaskw does not need material things to make her look beautiful in order to conquer the Invisible One’s heart.
Oochigeaskw did not ask for the help of magic to give her happiness which was the Invisible one, instead she was blessed with it. On the other hand, Cinderella and Prince Charming are able to unite and become one forever with the aide of magic. Further, even though the Native American “Cinderella” has a different story compared to the Disney version, the theme of magic and test given to “Cinderella” helps readers understand it is a Cinderella story, as does the fact that both characters at the end marry their beloved and live happily ever after.
Readers can also conclude that every “Cinderella” does not necessarily need magic; with self-confidence and patience one can achieve their goals and desires just like Oochigeaskw. Work Cited “Oochigeaskw-The Rough-Faced Girl. ” Writing and Reading Across The Curriculum, 12th Ed. Laurence Behrens and Leonard J. Rosen. Boston: Pearson, 2013. 245-247. Print. Grant, Campbell. “ Walt Disney’s Cinderella. ” Writing and Reading Across The Curriculum, 12th Ed. Laurence Behrens and Leonard J. Rosen. Boston: Pearson, 2013. 247-249. Print.