Down syndrome in the United States

Down syndrome in the United States. Although this increase in life span points to an increasing number of people living with DS over the past few decades, very little is known about the actual prevalence of Down syndrome. National population-based prevalence estimates of birth defects based on data from birth defects surveillance programs in the US were first published in 2006 (using data for birth years since 1999) and currently are based on only approximately onethird of US births.1,2 Furthermore, registry systems do not routinely provide follow-up after birth, so that deaths of persons with DS must be determined from separate sources.3,9 As a result, there is currently no reliable estimate of the number of people living with DS in the US. Such an estimate is essential for prioritizing Down syndrome research and planning services for persons with DS

Down syndrome

Use LIRN or other reputable journal resources to find scholarly articles pertaining to physical therapy and the pathological condition you have chosen. The report should provide an overview of the pathological condition including but not limited to causes, population primarily affected, primary characteristics/signs/symptoms and mortality/morbidity rate. Discuss the impact the condition has on a patient’s functional abilities and appropriate or effective evidence based physical therapy interventions. Include discussion regarding the strength and validity of the research article. In the conclusion, summarize the important points that “every PTA” should know about the condition and recommended physical therapy interventions.

This analysis estimated the annual US live births of persons with Down syndrome for 1909– 2007, estimated US age-specific annual deaths of persons with Down syndrome for 1909– 2007, and used this information to estimate the size of the US population of persons with DS using proportion of deaths. Existing estimates do not consider the shorter life expectancy for individuals with Down syndrome or the varying prevalence of the conditionover time. Our results can be used to facilitate planning for medical care and other services for persons with Down syndrome. We propose evaluating expert opinions to project the future prevalence of Down syndrome in the US.