Corporate administration vs. the vocation of learning

Corporate administration vs. the vocation of learning. The article “University Wars: The Corporate Administration Vs. The Vocation of Learning” by John McMurtry is insightful and informative because the author seeks to inform the readers about how university administrators hinder academic freedom. The article was written for individuals who read the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives’ (CCPA) journal, The Monitor.

The author targets to reach students, educators university administrators, government officials and head of corporate institutions who are interested in issues concerning university education. The article’s thesis is that university administrators hinder the advancement of learning and dissemination of knowledge because their primary intention is to increase their own income.

Corporate administration

The author organizes his main arguments in a clear manner. McMurty begins by choosing a broad topic. He chooses the university as the main topic of discussion. Afterwards, the author gets specific by introducing the challenges professors and students face. McMurty points out that university administrators attack the professors who are concerned with dispersing knowledge. The arguments made connect well with the article’s thesis. Throughout the article, McMurty informs the readers how university administrators frustrate professors and students in an attempt to bring money back to their pockets (McMurtry 16).

Towards the end of the article, the author suggests some solutions to the problems facing universities. The main arguments are well organized in the article making it easy for readers to read the author’s claims, intentions and possible solutions. All the arguments made in the article relate with each other and with the thesis to fulfill the author’s objective.

The author organizes his main arguments in a clear manner. McMurty begins by choosing a broad topic. He chooses the university as the main topic of discussion. Afterwards, the author gets specific by introducing the challenges professors and students face. McMurty points out that university administrators attack the professors who are concerned with dispersing knowledge. The arguments made connect well with the article’s thesis. Throughout the article, McMurty informs the readers how university administrators frustrate professors and students in an attempt to bring money back to their pockets (McMurtry 16).