Cholera and the Human Genome

Cholera and the Human Genome

Cholera is a disease caused by bacteria that are transmitted through contaminated water. According to Mayo Clinic (2017), the diseases results in severe diarrhea and dehydration hence can cause death within several hours. In industrialized countries such the United States, installation of modern sewage has helped eliminate the disease considering that the last outbreak in the US was in 1911. However, cholera is still present in countries such as Haiti, Southeast Asia, and Africa. Cholera epidemic mainly occur when an area is faced by a disaster such as war and people are forced to live in the same area without proper sanitation (Mayo Clinic, 2017). Since individuals with cholera die from dehydration, the disease is easily treated with rehydration solution. Cholera is a fatal disease which has killed thousands prompting human gene to evolve in order to fight the disease.

When an individual becomes exposed to the bacteria that cause cholera, they do not become ill immediately and they might not know they are infected. However, they are still capable of spreading cholera since Vibrio cholerae is still present in the stool (Mayo Clinic, 2017). Furthermore, they suffer from mild diarrhea which is hard to differentiate from diarrhea caused by other problems. After a few days of infection, diarrhea becomes intense and causes dangerous loss of fluids. Other symptoms associated with the disease include nausea, vomiting, and dehydration (Mayo Clinic, 2017). Similarly, a person experiences sunken eyes, irritability, dry mouth, shriveled skin, and extreme thirst. Mayo Clinic (2017) goes ahead to state that dehydration is accompanied by rapid loss of minerals from blood hence a person suffers from electrolyte imbalance which further leads to more symptoms such as muscle cramps and shock.