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Texting and Driving

Texting and Driving Persuasive

Texting and Driving Persuasive.
Just before senior year, it was a warm summer night. You were in the car with your friends, blasting music, singing along, and having a conversation on the phone all at the same time. It was all fun and games until you see the bright headlights of a large semi truck, and that was that. Crash! I’m sure there have been many situations like this one and it is a very distressing concept. Too many people make the wrong decision of texting and driving. When I tell them not to do it, they would just argue, “I’m really good at it though, trust me. I do understand that it turned into a continuous process; however, that doesn’t mean that accidents can’t happen. That is what they all think, but anything can happen to any driver, at anytime. My friends have learned not to text and drive when I am in the car with them, but that doesn’t mean they don’t do it when they are alone, or when I’m not in the car. In fact, I think that is even worse because there is then no one to tell them, “Look out! ” or “Stop! ” By this point there is no turning back, just heartbroken family members and friends. Every day I see at least one person texting and driving, and it makes my heart skip a beat.
Not only am I worried for that person to get in an accident, but I’m concerned for me, and other drivers on the road. I notice them driving carelessly, and swerving on the road. No matter what kind of situation you’re in, there are no good ones when it comes to the road. When my brother got his license he was caught texting and driving by my mom’s friend who then told her. She was furious! “Luke! ” My mom snapped. “Why would you even think of texting and driving? You can get killed. ” “It was only once; I don’t do it often though! ” remarked Luke. “No matter how many times you do it, it only takes one accident to kill you. replied my mom, with fire in her eyes. She was very angry that day because she thought better of him. She too knows the bad of texting and driving; therefore, she is a strong nonbeliever too. I remember one bright sunny day, the snow was sparkling from the intense rays of the sun, and the icicles were melting. But apparently some black ice hid on the street. As we were driving, I saw a fellow driver not notice the turn for the exit. He drove straight ahead into the metal railing along the bend. And BOOM! I saw this event occur right at my own two eyes. It was miserable too, considering the fact that it was a luxury car.
As we I drove past it, I knew right then and there that texting and driving is definitely not an option for me. Its hard to say how tempting texting while driving is, but all I know is that when I get my license, I am never going to start the habit. That is my thought now and I hope it will always stay that way. I am hoping to change not just the lives of my friends and family, but to others all over the road. Next time your cup holder vibrates, leave it alone, and focus on the road. Your life, and the lives of your passengers are in your hands, so make good decisions. Texting kills! This I believe.

Texting and Driving Persuasive

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Texting and Driving Narrative Essay

Texting and Driving Narrative Essay.
It has commercials, ads, and billboards all over the united States promoting not to text and drive “it can wait”, because it is very dangerous; not only for their life but others as well. This somewhat graphic commercial asserts that an ordinary person can take their eyes off the road and in an instance destroy his/her live or the lives of others, and does this effectively through graphic images, common text message subject matter, and a negative theme. The use of graphic Images are very apparent In this commercial. This commercial appeals to their sense of compassion by having a very shocking end result.
In the rhetorical appeal they are using ethos because they are showing what could actually happen. They choose to use very graphic real images, so people may actually listen and see what can happen that fast. The somewhat disturbing result helps people to see the real case scenario in hopes that maybe they can get the message across. It has a very emotional mood because no one wants to crash and possibly die from that mistake. This commercial Is very appealing because it works to show Just how quick things can happen.
The first time someone sees this particular commercial AT&T can remember make a vow to never ext and drive again. It shows that the text messages are coming through and the girl is reading and testing back then the crash happened. The rescue people knew she was testing and driving because they found her phone and text messages were still coming through and she crashed not long after she sent the text. It Is one thing to hear what “can” happen, but to actually see a real Life scenario on the TV screen did something to the viewers, and they believe this happens to too many when they see it.

The commercial appeals to teenagers by showing a common theme in their conversations. The girl is testing her friend about a boy. She keeps looking down at her phone and back up at the road. The testing then suddenly becomes more Interesting to her, and she Is more wrapped up in the phone than she is the road. Then she does not make It to where she Is going because that text was more knows she is about to crash, but it is then too late to do anything about it. Waiting to check a phone can help save people from getting hurt or killed.
Taking eyes off of the road for five seconds equals driving the length of a football field without looking at the road. Testing and driving is as bad as drinking and driving. Most people who are exiting and driving spend more time in the other lane than their own. The ad is not only for teenagers but it is for everyone. Parents are Just as bad as teenagers about testing and driving. Phones show be turned off while the vehicle is in motion and not back on till the vehicle stops. Negative themes are quite uncommon for commercials.
Commercials usually try to promote the ads. In a rhetorical appeals, they use pathos because they are showing the emotional content. In this instance, it is very effective to teenagers. The commercial makes them actually believe that this could happen to them. AT&T wants to use the worst possible scenario to make sure teenagers see the consequences that could come of their actions. Nobody wants to lose a love one because of this mistake, so that is why the commercial is promoting to not text and drive.
Negative images are more realistic and make people actually see what can happen very quickly. Making the mistake to text while driving is not only putting one person’s life in danger but everyone who they meet on the road. When meeting a car on the same side of the road is never a good feeling and then seeing them on their phone. AT has decided against preaching the same boring message we may hear room our parents “stay off of that phone! ” They have chosen a much more effective way to get the message across by using a drastic and emotional theme.
As people can see, AT effectively uses a common text message conversation, a negative theme, and graphic images to get a very powerful message across. Since AT is so popular, people think it can potentially save more lives. It pulls at the viewer’s heart strings and shows Just how easily something like this can happen if they do not pay attention to the road. AT&T is trying to get the message out that the text messages can wait. There is nothing more important to do or say while driving.

Texting and Driving Narrative Essay

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Texting and Driving Critique Essay

Texting and Driving Critique Essay.
In Citra, Florida, 13 year old, Margay Schee was hit by a semi-truck traveling at 60 miles per hour1 . The truck driver claimed to have not seen Mrs. Schee. In Rudolph, Wisconsin, 58 year old, Julie Davis was killed instantly when she was hit while walking alongside a road with a friend1. Mrs. Davis was hit by a 19 year old going 70 miles per hour with no attempt at hitting the brakes1. Ashley Johnson of Asheville, North Carolina was 16 years old when she died from distracted driving1. She was driving to help tutor a student when she veered into another lane, crashing into an oncoming vehicle1.
At the scene, her phone was found with a received text message at the time of the crash1. “Just in 2010, 3,092 people were killed in crashes [like the incidents above] involving a distracted driver…” Distracted driving has become the number one killer of Americans in the past few years, having alcohol related accidents drop to the number two slot. Though these two issues stack up differently, studies show that they are nearly the same thing. Studies done at the University of Utah show those drivers on mobile phones are actually more impaired than drivers at a . 8 Blood Alcohol Level. In New York in 1910, jurisdiction adopted laws against drunk driving and since then this issue has been heavily enforced. With this new form of distracted driving, which compares greatly to drunken driving, laws should be set and enforced. Not only should laws dealing with this issue be made and met, these laws should be heavily enforced until all drivers and passengers understand the risks and consequences of such an act. Distracted driving can be broken down into three different types of distractions: visual, manual, and cognitive.
Visual is the distraction that takes the driver’s eyes off the road. Manual is the distraction of taking the driver’s hands off of the wheel. Cognitive is the distraction that occurs when the driver starts thinking of things other than the road ahead. Texting while driving is the most alarming distraction because it involves all three types of distractions at once. With many diverse distractions falling under each of these three categories, Congressman Eliot L. Engel from New York eagerly joined the U. S. Department of Transportation’s “efforts in curbing distracted driving. The bill, H. R. 1772 Distracted Driving Prevention Act of 2011, “directs the Secretary of Transportation to make distracted driving prevention incentive grants for each fiscal year to states that enact laws that prohibit and establish fines for texting and/or handheld cellphone use while driving6. ” This Act came about when the President, Barrack Obama, signed a law having to deal with “Moving Ahead in the 21st century”. This action trickles down from the federal government and onto the state and local governments.

The federal governments provide the grants, and in return, the state and local governments provide the enforcement of the federal guidelines prohibiting distracted driving. Representative Engel also agrees with Secretary Ray Lahood, United States Secretary of Transportation, when he says, “distracted driving has become a deadly epidemic6”. With an 11% increase in distracted driving deaths for the year of 2011, Representative Engel is accurate in agreeing that distracted driving is a deadly epidemic. “This grant program will provide approximately $17. million to states that have laws banning distracted driving in the fiscal year 2013…an additional $5 million to develop paid advertising to support state enforcement of laws against distracted driving2. ” Engel and Lahood see these grants as large investments in the future through education on texting and driving. With the technology of smart phones and phones in general, Global Positioning Systems, advanced radios, and passengers, new drivers are not getting properly educated and disciplined on the consequences of distracted driving because these advancements are all they know when it comes time for them to drive.
Lahood says, “This new grant program will provide states that have distracted driving laws with important resources to help save lives and prevent injuries2. ” During the National Distracted Driving Summit, it was announced that remarkable statistics have shown baring texting and driving has raised positive outcome with more than 550 companies vowing to implement rules against distracted driving. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, pilot programs in Hartford, Connecticut and Syracuse, New York indicate that enforcing restrictions on cell phone use is yielding positive results8.
Also during this Summit, those who oppose this law were able to relay their thoughts. The overall effectiveness of anti-distracted driving laws were brought up. The number one disapprover of this Act, Adrian Lund, president of the Highway Loss Data Institute, says, after studies, “Texting bans haven’t reduced crashes at all…crashes have actually increased8. ” Lahood fired back, calling the study “completely misleading” and that Lund’s research did not include all information8.
Other than the few, Highway Loss Data Institute and The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, who do not approve of the distracted driving laws, the Act of 2011 has many strong supporters8. With celebrities such as the talk host Oprah Winfrey encouraging viewers to sign a document saying they will not text and drive, and the Jonas Brothers asking fans to join them in their pledge against the practice; the word is being spread about the dangers8. Though the publicity is able to reach a certain percentage of drivers; that percentage and the remaining percent should not be neglected and should be reached through other means of knowledge.
With facts and persuasion, thirty states, the District of Columbia, and Guam have all banned texting and driving, along with eight states, the District of Columbia, and the Virgin Islands banning the use of any hand held devices. Law enforcement has been able to go through with these laws by defining driving, personal wireless communications, primary offense, public road, and texting: “‘Driving’ means operating a motor vehicle on a public road, including operation while temporarily stationary because of traffic. Personal Wireless Communications Device’ means a device through which personal wireless services are transmitted. ‘Texting’ means reading from or manually entering data into a personal wireless communications device, including doing so for the purpose of SMS texting, emailing, and instant messaging. ‘Primary Offense’ means an offense for which a law enforcement officer may stop a vehicle solely for the purpose of issuing a citation in absence of evidence of another offense5. “‘Driving’ means operating a motor vehicle on a public road, including operation while temporarily stationary because of traffic. ‘Personal Wireless Communications Device’ means a device through which personal wireless services are transmitted. ‘Texting’ means reading from or manually entering data into a personal wireless communications device, including doing so for the purpose of SMS texting, emailing, and instant messaging. Primary Offense’ means an offense for which a law enforcement officer may stop a vehicle solely for the purpose of issuing a citation in absence of evidence of another offense5. ” With these definitions laid out for all drivers, there leaves little room to argue the law. With rules and guidelines set for drivers, the states also have guidelines to follow in order to receive financial support for their individual pursuits to decrease distracted driving accidents.
The major requirements within the long list of requirements are establishing a minimum fine for the first violation with increased fines as the number of violations increase, prohibition of youth cell phone use, prohibition of a driver younger than 18 from using personal wireless communication devices, and required distracted driving issues to be tested as a part of the State’s Driver’s License examination5. One controversy that has come with this Act is the question of how the government plans on paying for these grants; where will all this money come from when given out to states.
With these grants coming out of taxpayer’s money, these grants have become an issue. Representative Black, Republican -Tennessee, led the opposition to the distracted driving grants, already approved by senators. Using the 10th amendment, she insists “the federal government should not be manipulating state law through taxpayer funded distracted driving grants10. ” Representative Black explains to the House that what is best for one state might not be best for another state, therefore causing many of the problems in this plan.
With this issue brought up, Rep. Black points out and highlights that distracted driving laws should just be left up to each individual state and not mandated from the federal government. During Representative Black’s speech to the House, she brought up many good points; such as all of the grant money coming from taxpayer’s money, but the overarching point of this act and these laws were not recognized. With matters such as drinking and driving or texting and driving, they will not be conquered without major enforcements.
The federal government is trying to take this matter into their own hands out of the desire to stop distracted driving, increase the education on distracted driving, and to decrease the number of wrecks and deaths due to distracted driving per year. Representative Black makes the point about letting the states decide because laws vary state to state and even with these guidelines coming down from the federal government the states are still able to go about decreasing distracted driving in their own manner with the small list of guidelines given by the federal government.
The federal government is not trying to control each state and local government but merely help get hard hitting issues under control, therefore granting money to do so. The majority of studies show that drivers as a whole understand that texting and driving is dangerous but without any more thought commit this act anyways. An online survey of 1,999 teens ages 16-19 found that 86% had driven while distracted even though 84% know it’s dangerous. Through the campaign “Stop the Texts. Stop the Wrecks. ” Over thirty basic statistics are shown.
A texting driver is twenty three times more likely to get into a crash than a non-texting driver says Virginia Tech Transportation Institute in 2009. In 2009, 5,474 people were killed in U. S. roadways and an estimated additional 448,000 were injured in motor vehicle crashes that were reported to have involved distracted driving11. With H. R. 1772 Distracted Driving Prevention Act of 2011, the grants developed will not only enforce discipline through citations and law enforcement, but will raise public awareness.
This Prevention Act is needed for the education of current and upcoming drivers, recommitting citations, law enforcement, and the decrease in texting and driving, and the decrease in wrecks and deaths due to distracted driving. H. R. 1772 Distracted Driving Prevention Act of 2011 was introduced to the congressional committee in the 112th Congress on May 05, 2011. This bill’s description given to the congressional committee was to “amend titles 23 and 49 [which both deal with National Highway Traffic Safety], United States Code, to reduce injuries and deaths caused by cell phone use and texting while driving, and for other purposes. After many hearings led by Representative Eliot Engel, Democratic -New York, the bill and its supporters are waiting for it to be reported by the committee, passed to the House, then passed to the Senate, and finalized by the President’s signature12. According to govtrack. us, this bill has a zero percent chance of being enacted. The Prevention Act is a re- introduction of H. R. 3994, Distracted Driving Prevention Act of 2009, brought up in the 111th Congress that had a negative three percent impact (-3%)12.
With the sponsor of this bill being a member of the minority party, a negative two percent (-2%) adds into the likelihood of this bill being passed12. The only positive actualities of this bill and its sponsors is the bill’s cosponsors, Donna Christensen (Democratic – Virgin Islands) and Carolyn Maloney (Democratic – New York), who are also a member of the minority party, has a high leadership score, adding a positive three percent (+3)12. A key fact given by the legislation is that only four percent (4%) of all House of Representatives bills in 2009-2010 were actually enacted12.
The U. S Department of Transportation has yet to be able to make distracted driving illegal on its own because the jurisdiction falls under each state. Even though nothing has been passed by Congress, many states have stepped up to pass tough laws against distracted driving. With optimistic thinking, Representative Engel still pushes forward and continues to campaign his hope for change on our highways and in our auto vehicles through Congress.
A recent law was mandated in Fort Lee, New Jersey prohibiting pedestrians from texting. This law was highly ridiculed, but the local government’s thought process was “if we cannot stop drivers from texting, we better make sure that pedestrians do not text so they can keep their eyes peeled for reckless drivers. This concept seems outlandish, but without the support of the federal government through the Distracted Driving Prevention Act some places around the country cannot enforce such laws alone.
If legislation approves this bill statistic will plummet tremendously leaving the highways, vehicles, and drivers in a safer environment when teenagers like Ashley Johnson are driving to tutor other young adults or elderly ladies like Mrs. Davis taking their daily walk. Distracted driving is common, tempting, and deadly and through H. R. 1772 Distracted Driving Prevention Act of 2011 lives can be changed, lives can be saved.

Texting and Driving Critique Essay

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Physiological Reason Behind Texting and Driving

Physiological Reason Behind Texting and Driving.
But a few days later that same student, while driving, would hear their hone chime and reach for it without second guessing their actions. Humanity is attached to technology, mainly cell phones because of their vast capabilities which lead people not to think about the ramifications cell phones could create, particularly when they are used while driving. People who refrain from cellophane use while driving usually ask: “Why would someone text and drive if they knew the numberless consequences it could cause? “.
Believe it or not a majority of the population, especially teenagers have a psychological need to use their cell phones. Human beings have not Just a desire, UT an uncontrollable need to socialize with other people. When people communicate with others they find a sense of self-identification, while also getting a sensation of acceptance, and recognition. Even the Supreme Court has recognized that in today’s society testing has become an important way of self-identification; which is how one person pictures themselves with someone else.
The mind yearns for relationships with other people, and people nowadays maintain steady contact with their friends and family through technology. Humanity is willing to go too certain extent to talk to people due to their need to associate with others. One of these common extents includes multitasking such as: watching television and testing, doing chores and testing, and even driving and testing. Another psychological need of the human brain consists of the yearning to feel wanted and belonged. By receiving Just one text message, a person consciously or even unknowingly feels these two sensations.

They begin to feel wanted and belonged because their mind realizes another person wants to engage in a conversation with them. Many teens have what official identified as problematic phone use which known to be caused by several psychological variables. A study conducted by Adrian Bianca and James G. Phillips proved that one’s self-esteem, neurotics, age, and gender are determining factors in the amount of time one spends on their cell phone (Bianca, Adrian, and James G. Philips). All of these factors are different for each person which is why some people abstain from testing and driving, and others do not.
In a different study by three doctors it is proven that there are three indulgences earned from testing, and these gratifications leads to addiction (Young and Connected). The three indulgences are: self, social, and security. These indulgences lead to what doctors refer to as a behavioral addiction to testing. Doctors also say an addiction to technology is not easy to overcome. This addicting behavior gives anyone the ability to communicate practically instantly with another, giving them a sense of belonging. A majority of the population admits to going to a certain extent to talk to friends and family by simply testing and driving.
A sense of belonging or fitting in emits positive, addicting feelings that many people wish for. This identifies why some people, mainly teenagers, find it difficult to immediately stop testing and driving. Testing brings emotional benefits that indicate a psychological need to text, no matter the situation. More people should come to the realization of the myriad consequences testing and driving could cause. The most well-known consequence of testing at the wheel is car accidents. Also, the primary consequence of testing and driving is getting in an accident.
The United States Department of Transportation proved that testing and driving makes the driver twenty times more likely to get into a car accident (Federal Ban on Testing for Commercial Truck Drivers). The chances of getting in a crash increase dramatically when a driver uses their phone due to the fact that the human brain cannot completely focus on two different things simultaneously. Testing and driving not only puts the driver’s life in danger but the passengers’ lives as well. If a driver gets into an accident due to testing and driving they could easily kill or injure another person typically resulting in a Jail sentence.
If a driver gets into an accident that was their fault and ended up hurting or injuring someone they would feel pure guilt, an amount of guilt that no one should have to deal with. Right alongside the guilt the driver would get a sense of regret. In the back of their headed the accident would always linger and they would begin to think: “The text wasn’t that important, if only I waited until I got home, I wouldn’t have hurt another human being. ” The large amount of regret could even cause psychological problems that would take time to erase.
Along with the probability of accidents, and the psychological effects, testing and driving is also against the law. Only seven states in America have no restrictions on testing and driving while the other forty-three have various laws regarding the subject. Some laws ban all cell phone use, and others ban it for children under the GE of eighteen. If a driver breaks a law concerning cell phone use the driver could be fined or even get license suspension. Drivers should refrain from testing and driving due to the innumerable consequences it could lead to.
The chance of someone growing up to text and drive is determined by their parents driving habits, other drivers, and their age level. Without even knowing it, parents easily influence what kind of drivers their kids are going to be. If a child constantly sees their parent on their cell phone while they drive the child will begin to think it must be okay to text and drive because their parents do. Two thirds of high school children say their parent or parents text while they drive, thus meaning, these children will most likely text and drive. Another factor that influences a driver’s habits includes other driver’s behaviors.
When teens first start driving and see other drivers being careless by testing while driving, they deem it acceptable. By seeing strangers, and even friends text and drive a beginner driver starts to think that the act of testing and driving has no ramifications. Seventy one percent of drivers text and drive end up unknowingly influencing others drivers (WAIF). Teens typically text ND drive more than older people due to their high level of self-confidence. In this generation, teenagers typically believe they are invincible. Therefore teens believe they can handle testing and driving.
Truthfully the human brain cannot focus on two things at once, but the stubborn teenagers of this generation refuse to believe in the incapability of multitasking. There are many organizations and inspirational speakers that are country wide trying to reach out towards teenagers to engrave the possible consequences of testing and driving into their minds. A major organization is Stop the texts. Stop the wrecks funded by Ad Council. They have collaborated with the office of State Attorney Generals and the National High and the National Highway Traffic Administration to gain more power and have a more profound effect on people.
Their campaign includes Public Service Advertising on the radio, television, and social media platforms. On their website they have tips and tactics on how to change the negative behavior of testing and driving. A website, funded by the government, known as D! Striation takes the motto “One text or call could wreck it all. ” The United States Department of Transportation has banned testing and cell phone usage for immemorial drivers and encourages states to make laws against cell phone usage while driving. The website does an effective Job of informing their audience about the epidemic, how to get involved, and how to keep the roadways safe.
Since we do live in the twenty-first century there are solutions to technology, with technology. A well-known app is Phonograph, which disables the ability to text while traveling over ten miles per hour. This application can also notify parents or another adult when the device is traveling at an unsafe speed. Testing and driving has become a well- now problem and people are trying to find ways to prevent it, but even where there are solutions there has to be a person willing to make a change in their behavior.
Humanity’s technological advances have so many good qualities that people do not want to realize its downfalls. Cell phone usage while driving is caused by the psychological benefits of testing, and the influence of other drivers. Drivers around the world should be more aware of the consequences testing and driving causes, and how much trauma an accident can produce. Humanity should realize there is a time and place for testing, and driving does not happen to be one of them.

Physiological Reason Behind Texting and Driving

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Texting and Driving a Thin Line

Texting and Driving a Thin Line.
Driving a Thin Line I’d be lying if I said I never text while driving. But I recognize the dangers, and try to do it as little as possible. However, there are still incidents that occur. One day, I was driving down Highway 6, passing Walmart, and received a text from my brother asking what time baseball practice was. I went to reply and took my focus off my driving. This immediately endangered myself, anyone else in the car, and everyone in the cars around me. While texting, I have no ability to respond to events as they occur around me on the road.
Even if I may be able to text while driving and maintain control and not crash, if someone around was to do something dumb, my ability to react safely to that is severely diminished. For example, the other day I was driving home on Williams Trace, my radio blaring 94. 5 The Buzz, Erik in the passenger seat, when someone swerved to avoid debris on the road. I was able to react to this, and get out of the way, because I was focused solely on the road, with no distractions.
Driving is always dangerous, because even if I drive perfectly, I could still get in a wreck because of the actions of others, over which I have no control. And by texting while driving the chances of this are greatly increased. That also assumes that when texting, I am also able to retain 100% of my normal driving faculties. This is completely false though. Even if I am able to text without looking at my phone, my mind is still distracted from an activity that requires my full attention.

And if I do take my eyes off the road to text, I might as well be driving blind. My ability to conduct myself safely is almost completely gone at that point. There have been times when I’ve been looking at my phone texting, then looked up to find myself rapidly approaching stopped cars, and had to slam on the brakes. Every time so far I’ve been lucky, but that can only last so long. Eventually I won’t look up in time, and will slam into the back of those cars. Every time I pick up my phone, I’m putting lives on the line. Who knows who’ll be in that car I hit?
It could be full of little kids on their way home from soccer practice, and I just potentially hit them. Texting while driving goes beyond just endangering myself on the road. Every time I pick up that phone, I’m potentially harming all of my passengers, plus all the cars around me. A lot of the time when I drive, my brother is in the passenger seat. So when I drive with him, its my responsibility to keep him safe. It goes beyond just making a stupid decision that affects myself, I’m making a stupid decision that affects my little brother.
I’m putting his life on the line through my own foolishness and selfishness. The same holds true for anyone on the road with me. That grandmother driving to the store to pick up some groceries, or the little kid riding along with their parents to get some lunch, I’m personally putting their lives on the line when I text and drive. There is rarely any legitimate reason to text and drive. The vast majority of the texts I receive and send are not life or death situations that require my immediate attention, but when I answer that text, I put myself in a life or death situation.
I’m also failing in the responsibility that I and every other person takes up when they get behind the wheel, to drive to the best of my abilities in order to keep myself and those around me safe. It would hurt nothing if I was to simply ignore my phone for the duration of the trip, then answer any messages I’ve received. So by texting while driving, I’m putting at risk the lives of all around me, plus my own, all so that can have conversation that could wait.

Texting and Driving a Thin Line

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