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Supervision

Working Under Supervision

Working Under Supervision.
Generally teamwork can be defined as a group of people working under supervision together to accomplish specified goals. In nursing the main goal is to improve the patient’s health and promote recovery. Supervision, according to Harries (1987), means “to be in charge of a group of workers or students and be responsible for making sure that they do their work properly” [Longman (1995, p. 1449)]. Working with a group of people has the potential for being a supportive and enriching experience.
It increases the nurse’s knowledge, acquired by sharing experiences, skills, ideas and techniques obtained by watching, observing and learning from other members of the team when performing a task. Nurses are required to work as part of multi-disciplinary teams (MDT). The care and management of individuals, relies heavily on the participation in team based efforts and requires individuals who share a common goal, in order to create a well managed health care system. The concept of team work within health care was created to “provide quality holistic healthcare to every patient”.
Each team member must have a clear role and contribute effectively in order to maintain a well balanced and supported environment. It gives the patient high standard of care: It creates an opportunity for every member of the team to provide information about the patient’s need which can be orally or written, this will allow the care team to have an insight and understanding of how to offer the best possible care for the patient. Teamwork makes the duties easier and faster: If every member of staff collaborates and works together, less time is required to carry out the job and it is easy.

In this case, the workload is well distributed and this relieves stress, saves useful time that can be used to observe patient needs, deterioration and improvement. There is less chance of inaccuracy because each member is focussed and co-ordinated on his or her work thereby enhancing effectiveness, whereas if it was one person doing the job the person is running from one point to the other in order to meet up with patient’s need thereby creating room for mistakes and disorganisation [Potter and Perry (1995)].
In conclusion teamwork is very important in nursing and can also be enjoyable if all members are actively and sincerely partakers to ensure that the work is rational to every member and also meet targets. [Potter and Perry (1995)] Working under supervision builds the nurse’s character, confidence and self-esteem knowing that the supervisor cares about the work done. This will stimulate the nurse to be of good conduct. In the same way, patients feel safeguarded and confident knowing that there is a competent person in charge.
According to Fowler (1995) Supervision involves a learning, supportive and monitoring process. The learning process exposes the nurse to liaise with other professional bodies such as the doctors, radiotherapists, porters, cleaners, healthcare assistants, and paramedics and so on, as well as the patients and family members. The monitoring process could be formal or informal to assure that the desired standard is achieved. The supportive process includes discussion of difficulties, challenges, dilemmas and solution of how to deal with them so that positive goals are achieved [Hinchliff S. 2008)]. These processes are essential and vital for the health and safety of the patient. The nurse can then learn how to deal with challenging situations which promotes the delivering of high standard of care to the client. In contrast, when there is no supervision there is no opportunity to update knowledge, develop and improve skills. The nurse might be implementing the wrong skill or technique in attending to a patient. This might have a dangerous effect on the patient and the overall team.

Working Under Supervision

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Week Two Supervision Homework

Week Two Supervision Homework.
Satisfied employees, however, refers to a feeling when they have completed a job or something that feels that they have done their job well. Either side of the argument will somehow make money, promotion and/or will get benefits. They’re closely related that job satisfaction can be a motivation and/or they do it for the money, promotion and/or benefits but their satisfaction will come naturally. 2. Briefly discuss several specific actions that supervisors can take to improve employee motivation. No matter how big or small the company, motivating the team is really important to business.
When people lose their motivation can create less productive, less of an asset to the business. Either way, employees’ motivation will affect the overall success in a company. Praising them when they’re doing well is probably the most common and most effective as a motivation factor. Providing opportunities for growth such as adding responsibilities or challenges. 3. Explain why many managers frequently raise the following questions: “Why didn’t you do what I told you to do? ” Managers have higher position than the employees being managed.
Therefore, they have the privilege to make decisions and to say something like “Why didn’t you do what I told you to do? ” They are more experience and probably have the education to uphold the position. Since they are more experience and probably been there longer than the employees, they have gotten use to the methods they have been using. Some just don’t have the time to change the nature in workplace, why change something that is not broken. Or maybe because some managers has a superiority complex and thinks that the way he wants something done is the best way. 4.

Discuss the following statement: Meanings are in people, not in words. This can be explained in a lot of ways but I believe that Meanings is a personal preference. Just like the bible, it can be interpreted differently from other religion and culture even though the words are exactly the same. Don’t assume people know what you mean when you tell them something. The meaning is something that will depend on their own experiences, what was learnt by others. People is what gives words meaning.. Hopefully that made any sense but this is how I believe it can actually interpreted.

Week Two Supervision Homework

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Self-Supervision and Plan

Self-Supervision and Plan.
Clinical mental health counselors diagnose, treat, and test psychological disorders as well as support and teach clients skills needed for positive behavior changes. According to the 2012 American Mental Health Counselors Association’s (AMHCA) code of ethics “Mental health counselors believe in the dignity and worth of the individual. They are committed to increasing knowledge of human behavior and understanding of themselves and others. They use their skills only for purposes consistent with these values and do not knowingly permit their misuse by others.
While demanding for themselves freedom of inquiry and community, mental health counselors accept the responsibility this freedom confers: competence, objectivity in the application of skills, and concern for the best interest of clients, colleagues, and society in general”. They promote clients well-being on multiple levels by providing prevention services and treatments for a wide range of clients in diverse settings (Gladding & Newsome, 2010). According to the AMHCA, “mental health counselors have a primary obligation to safeguard information about individuals obtained in the course of practice, teaching, or research.
Personal information is communicated to others only with the person’s written consent or in those circumstances where there is clear and imminent danger to the client, to others or to society. Disclosure of counseling information is restricted to what is necessary, relevant and verifiable”. Another role of mental health counselors would be to actively learn and promote as well as be sensitive to the different cultural, ethnic, and diverse backgrounds of their clients. Continuous education, research, and self-awareness are the competent counselor’s key to effective, safe, diverse, accepting, and empowering counseling treatment and career.

With the growing diversity of the U. S. population, counselors are increasingly called on to make their services more widely available in racially and ethnically diverse localities. Ethnic and racial disparities in mental health are driven by social factors such as housing, education, and income (Vasquez, 2007). According to Vasquez, providing services to specific populations and building a niche practice can help a counselor remain competitive, gain new experiences and clients, and become recognized as an expert in working with particular populations.
“Developing awareness of cultural values — such as reliance on family support systems, collective decision making, spirituality and respect for peers — is paramount in reaching out to diverse populations. The ability to understand and respect a prospective client’s belief system is crucial” (Vasquez, 2007). Cultural factors such as counselors’ gender and office environment (like artwork and furniture arrangement) may have a bearing on the demand for as well as the delivery of services.
Counselor education faculty often urge students to celebrate diversity, but the average student is not equipped with knowledge of the components of the RESPECTFUL Counseling Cube (D’Andrea & Daniels, 2001). These include religion and spirituality (R), economic class background (E), sexual identity (S), psychological maturity (P), ethnic and racial identity (E), chronological stage (C), trauma (T), family background (F), unique physical characteristics (U), and geographical location (L).
Assessing the differing views of the above domains by diverse clients will affect the counseling process and can be used as a guide to accommodate culturally diverse clients. It is time for the counseling profession not only to recognize multicultural and diversity issues, but to develop systematic and practical approaches for helping counselors address and adapt counseling practices with culturally diverse clients (LeBeauf, Smaby & Maddux, 2009).
According to the American Mental Health Counseling Association (AMHCA), Clinical Mental Health Counselors who deliver clinical services must comply with state statutes and regulations governing the practice of clinical mental health counseling and adhere to all state laws governing the practice of clinical mental health counseling. In addition, they must also abide by all administrative rules, ethical standards, and other requirements of state clinical mental health counseling or other regulatory boards (AMHCA, 2012).
Mental health counselors promote clients well-being on multiple levels by providing prevention services and treatments for a wide range of clients in diverse settings (Gladding & Newsome, 2010). The profession of mental health counseling is continuously changing and evolving. Some of those changes are pleasantly welcomed, while others are not so much. Mental health counselors must stay updated, educated, and involved in all aspects of the profession in order to best serve their clients.
State and national policies on mental health counseling are there to protect everyone involved. State policies are designed to regulate the professional practice of mental health counseling. This regulation serves to protect the consumer by ensuring that their rights and dignity are not violated (Ford, 2006). Licensing and credentialing are essential to the profession of mental health counseling (Gladding & Newsome, 2010). Counselors must have the competencies to not only keep up with the constant change in public policies but to fight for the rights of their clients as well.
Mental health counselors must possess a strong desire to help others as well as the ability to inspire confidence, trust, and respect. Wellness and self-care activities are essential to a counselor’s well-being and professional longevity. Knowledge of human behavior, social systems, self-awareness, diversity, and respect for human dignity are all required qualifications of a mental health counselor. Self-awareness is one of the most important qualities and behaviors of an effective counselor because it is a way to explore their personalities, value systems, beliefs, natural inclinations, and tendencies.
To become self-aware is to become familiar with one’s worldviews and is often the first step for many in becoming self-improved through personal goal setting. Self-awareness is also empowering and therefore brings the counselor a better understanding of themselves and their clients. Morrisette (2002) describes how self-awareness impacts the counselor’s identity by helping them understand a myriad of situations from many different perspectives. This understanding enables them to seek out solutions with multiple approaches, and to understand and evaluate the consequences and outcomes of those approaches.
Self-awareness is a critical component to the development and success of a counselor because it the key to ethical decision making in counseling (Remley & Herlihy, 2010). A counselor that is self-aware not only understands their clients but also empathizes with them which in turn helps in building trust and developing a more therapeutic relationship. Clinical mental Health Counselors help clients work through a wide range of personal issues from career changes to relationship problems, anger management, depression, self-image, stress, parenting, addiction, and suicidal thoughts.
They have many different roles and responsibilities that it is almost impossible to identify them all, but most importantly they are obligated to develop and maintain a safe, trusting, and comfortable relationship for their clients at all times in order for the therapy to work. The mission of the American Counseling Association is to enhance the quality of life in society by promoting the development of professional counselors, advancing the counseling profession, and using the profession and practice of counseling to promote respect for human dignity and diversity (ACA, 2005).
I believe that my past experiences, diverse cultural background, and education will play a major role in my success as a mental health counselor. They have equipped me with the necessary tools to be an effective counselor. My familial experiences taught me to appreciate, respect, and love others. My cultural background taught me to never judge a book by its cover and to accept others for whom they are. My educational background in Medicine taught me how the human body works, and especially how genetics plays a major role on the development of the individual.
As a future mental health counselor I would like to help those that have gone through or shared similar experiences as I have. My families’ refuge experience taught me immensely and shaped me into the person that I am today. Some of those life lessons are but not limited to: perseverance, patience, self-efficacy, acculturation, love, forgiveness, cultural diversity, advocacy, and respect for one’s self and others. I view my past hardships and challenges as tools that will guide me to fulfill what may possibly be my calling in life which is to counsel, educate, and empower those that went through similar situations as my family and I did.
I would like to work in a private practice as a family therapist, or a refugee counselor, even for an advocacy group that would allow me to utilize my knowledge in the subject areas of refugee counseling, cultural/ethnic diversity, and immigrant counseling. As a refugee counselor I would not only focus on immigrants’ time in the United States, but also on their reasons for leaving their homeland, their experience of migration, their resources to function in unfamiliar environments, and the receptiveness of the new country (both politically and socially) to their presence.
My diverse background, education, and personal experience will allow me to understand and relate to my clients on a deeper level. Sue & Sue (2003) state that in order to be a culturally competent professional, one must first be aware of his or her own values and biases and how they may affect minorities. I believe that my personal life lessons have equipped me with the necessary tools to become an effective and culturally competent mental health counselor. The aim of counseling supervision should be supervision of the counselors own self supervision.
As Confucius said, “Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; teach him to fish and you feed him for a hundred years” (O’Hanlon & Wilk, 1987, p. 264). One of the most important qualities that I learned as a result of my family’s migratory experience would be that of self-confidence and self-efficacy. Fostering students’ confidence in their abilities to effectively work with the clients they intend to serve has been a longstanding goal of most counselor education programs (Bernard & Goodyear, 2004; Hensley, Smith, & Thompson, 2003).
In general, those counselors who are more confident in their ability to use their clinical skills in real life settings often provide a higher quality of counseling services to the clients they serve (Barnes, 2004; Bradley & Fiorini, 1999). One of the major approaches often used when investigating the process of gaining competence and self-confidence in particular domains of behavior has been self-efficacy theory (Bandura, 1989).
Also called perceived ability, self-efficacy refers to the confidence people have in their abilities to successfully perform a particular task (Bandura, 1986). Counseling self-efficacy (CSE), according to Larson (1998), is best described as the beliefs or judgments an individual has about his or her capability to effectively counsel a client in the near future. It is an important factor related to the level of anxiety novice counselors experience as well as the amount of effort they put forth to learn advanced counseling behaviors (Larson, 1998).
As a result, some counselor educators and researchers have suggested that increasing counseling trainees’ self-efficacy is a worthwhile training goal (Larson, 1998) and that examinations of this construct should be included in both the research and evaluation of counselor competency and training effectiveness (Yuen, Chan, Lau, Lam, & Shek, 2004). Koob (1998) stated that “Therapist burnout and career changes, even after several years of being a therapist, can be traced back to ineffective supervision and that traditional models of supervision have been ineffective in promoting positive perceived self-efficacy in therapists in training.
Therefore, the lack of self-efficacy greatly impacts the counselor’s effectiveness and competence levels. A supervision model that builds confidence and self-efficacy is needed for counselor success and career longevity. Such supervisory model would be the solution-focused which “emphasizes competence, strengths, and possibilities rather than deficits, weaknesses, and limitations” (Morrissette, 2002). Solution-focused supervision, in parallel with therapeutic practice, is about collaborating in a partnership which pays attention to, and develops, the supervisee’s interests, best intentions, and goals for their work (De Shazer, 1988).
Solution-focused supervision focuses on abilities, learning, and strengths that the therapist already has. It also allows the therapist to acknowledge what services work best with their clients such as their skills, abilities, and creative ideas. Another area of strength would be developing the supervisee’s preferred future or outcome and collaborating with the counselors and the clients regarding their work together where they focus on the goals and the solutions versus the problem.
It also allows the counselors to take a ‘not-knowing’ position as well as uses scales to measure and develop progress while offering appropriate, evidenced compliments respectfully. On the other hand, solution-focused supervision requires the problem or challenge to be clearly identified in order for it to be successful; must present a problem in order to seek resolution. Identifying the problem sometimes may present challenges to the counselor‘s self-supervision model.
This type of model allows the supervisees to evaluate themselves and identify and improve their own strengths and weaknesses which promote positive behavioral changes. Helping a refuge family of four adapt to their new surroundings is an example of solution focused supervision; guiding them through their acculturation process, where becoming competent of the family’s cultural beliefs, backgrounds, and worldviews through community resources and support groups.
The counselor can research and educate themselves about all aspects of the client’s culture giving the counselor self-confidence to conduct effective counseling sessions. The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) defines counselor supervision as: A form of instruction where by a supervisor monitors and evaluates an internship or practicum student’s performance and quality of service provided, facilitating associated learning and skill development experiences (CACREP, 2009).
According to the American Psychological Association, supervision covers a vast and diverse collection of responsibilities, including but not limited to: monitoring, evaluating, instructing, advising, modeling, consulting, supporting, foster autonomy within the supervisee and a responsibility to the patient, profession, system and society. Supervision also addresses legal and ethical issues that may arise, thus further emphasizing the importance of effective training within the mental health profession (www. apa. org).
It is necessary to improve client care, develop the professionalism of clinical personnel, and impart and maintain ethical standards in the field. The quality and focus of supervision may have a direct impact on counselor development, service delivery, and, most important, client care; and therefore should not be taken lightly. Supervision is a key component of counselor growth and ongoing development (Campbell, 2006) and impacts counselors’ attitudes, clinical style, and practice (Allen, Szollos, & Williams, 1986; Magnuson, Norem & Wilcoxon, 2002).
The type of supervision can vary depending on various aspects such as the supervisee’s place of internship and work environment, client population, financial resource, and diversity of clients. What appeals to some supervisees may not appeal to others? Some may not feel comfortable using the solutions focused supervision model as much as I do. This model stresses growth through increasing one’s self efficacy and boosting self-confidence which are vital aspects for me as a future mental health counselor that aspires to work with immigrant and refugee youth self-efficacy is.
Supervision of counselors has been described as an on-going, essential, mutually advantageous, and impossible task (Borders & Brown, 2005; Bernard & Goodyear, 2004; Zinkin, 1989). Counselor supervision has undergone a variety of transformations since its emergence, however, the main goal of supervision remained the same which is to help guide counselors provide a better service to their clients which promotes growth and positive way of living.

Self-Supervision and Plan

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Critical Analysis on Clinical Supervision in Schools

Critical Analysis on Clinical Supervision in Schools.
The purpose of this study is to present the definition of clinical supervision and some basic concepts that are currently being used in the clinical supervision of public schools today. By having a clearer understanding of these definitions and concepts, prospective supervisors in public education will be better equipped to do their jobs.
A situation has occurred due to the ever-increasing demand for supervisors in public education today in which those entering supervisory positions may not be properly equipped to supervise. This is primarily due to the fact that they may not understand all that is expected of them. To use economic terminology, the “demand is exceeding the supply”. As a result, supervisors may be placed into supervisory positions without a clear understanding of some definitions and concepts which have come into the realm of education fairly recently. Supervisors cannot do their jobs effectively if they are not properly educated in the roles and responsibilities of the clinical supervisor. The following study may serve as a review of some current definitions and concepts.
The earliest supervisors in America’s schools were often nothing more than overly critical “snoops” whose main job was to find what a teacher was doing wrong and report it to the teacher’s superiors. Today we refer to this type of supervisor as a “snoopervisor”. It was more likely that a teacher would receive a reprimand or dismissal as a result of those supervisory visits.

The role of the school supervisor has changed drastically from the humble beginnings of America’s schools. Our public school system has gone through many different stages of development. Likewise, our educational supervisors have evolved as well.
Since our public school system has gone through so many changes, (and continues to do so), a clear understanding of the responsibilities of clinical supervision is needed in order to properly prepare those wishing to serve in that capacity. Today’s supervisors must know what is expected of them and some of the more current methods and concepts being used in clinical supervision.
The research information in this study is limited to the study of school supervisors in the public school system. This study focused on supervisors who oversee the grade levels of Kindergarten through the 12th grade of high school. This study does focus on supervisors of colleges or other secondary educational institutions although much of this information may apply in those areas as well.
It is, therefore, the primary goal of this study to collect, compile, and organize information that will help to prepare those wishing to serve as school supervisors so that they may better understand some of the terminology and concepts in clinical supervision.
One of the more common roles of today’s school supervisor is that of providing teachers with the support they need to become better teachers. Today’s supervisor must be a coach or mentor, a “teacher’s teacher”, so to speak. Where supervisors once tore down teachers and criticized them, today they build up teachers and edify them.
The first use of the term “clinical supervision” was in 1961 when Morris Cogan used it in a proposal entitled Case Studies and Research in Clinical Supervision at Harvard University. Cogan defined clinical supervision in the following way:
“Clinical supervision may therefore be defined as the rationale and practice designed to improve the teacher’s classroom performance. It takes its principal data from the events of the classroom. The analysis of these data and the relationship between teacher and supervisor form the basis of the program, procedures, and strategies designed to improve the student’s learning by improving the teacher’s classroom behavior.”
From Cogan’s definition of clinical supervision we can see that the emphasis is on improvement of the teacher’s performance. This makes the role of today’s supervisor more of a supportive role. With that definition in mind, how can supervisors help teachers to become better teachers? What can supervisors do to improve the educational system in which they work? In the following study are a few examples of contemporary practices and concepts being utilized today to answer those questions. First of all, supervisors are concerned with the quality of teachers they have in their school and school system.
It is the job of supervisors to make sure that the teachers working in their school system are the best teachers possible, and that they are working to the best of their ability. Once teachers have been selected and hired, they must know that the supervisor is there to support them and help them to improve their teaching skills. In an article in Educational Digest, Thomas Harvey and Larry Frase put it this way:
“Coaching is not an option for school leaders but a basic function, along with counseling, mentoring, tutoring, confronting, and supporting. All of these will increase the commitment to quality and productivity.”
This simply means that supervisors must engage the teachers (as well as themselves) in a never-ending process of improvement. That means keeping up with current changes in teaching styles and curriculum. Supervisors must be willing to set an example for teachers by showing that they are also willing to make changes in the way that they do things. Now that we are in a new millenium in education we see the education system in a state of constant change. Everything we do changes regularly. Teaching styles, the equipment that we use in schools, and even the schools themselves continuously go through new stages of development. It is no longer acceptable to simply achieve and maintain a status quo. Supervisors must recognize this and always be ready to lead their teachers into the future and new ways of educating students.
The first way supervisors must lead their teachers is to make sure that they are aware of the legal aspects of education. In a recent article in Education magazine the authors said, “First on the list of all things a beginning teacher must do is to learn the policies of the school system and local school. A teacher who is legally challenged by a parent will receive support from the board of education when the teacher’s actions follow policy”. For this reason, supervisors should tell their beginning teachers that board policies and the school handbook are required reading. Once this has been concluded, supervisors can move on to the matter of teacher evaluation.
One method being used by many supervisors to evaluate and support new teachers is the peer support method. This concept has been touted as a promising way to build a teacher’s sense of professionalism. Margaret Johnson and Lucy Brown described one study in which teachers in a large elementary school with about 42 teachers were organized into collegial support teams (CSTs) to ,”…supervise their teaching performance and promote their professional growth.”. Many of the teachers involved in the study said that it created,”…a “safe zone” in which they could admit shortcomings and work to improve their practice.”. This method follows the philosophy that the best people to evaluate the performance of teachers in a particular school system are other teachers in the same school system. This method is becoming very popular.
Sometimes the path into the future of a school system may not be clear and narrow. There may be many different directions the supervisor may have to choose from. While discussing teachers who pursue positions in administration, Roberta Bernstein writes:
“The position of curriculum developer requires working in teams and reporting to the central office. While following the directions of your superiors, you will also want to provide teachers with a curriculum that excites them. It’s a balancing act.”
Indeed, supervisors must often let their own preferences fall by the wayside in order to reach the compromise that is the best, overall solution for a situation. One driving motivator behind the decision-making process should always be “What is the best thing for the students?”
The same thing holds true when evaluating teachers. Unfortunately, sometimes supervisors realize that a teacher just isn’t performing at the minimal level necessary to remain in the system. Even after working very hard to help a teacher come up to the required standard of teaching to remain in their position, the supervisor asks “What is the best thing for the students?” and realizes that a replacement may be what is needed.
There are many different reasons for teachers becoming marginal. In an article in Education Digest Don L. Fuhr identifies three categories of teachers who become “marginal”:
“First is the helpless marginal teacher who doesn’t grasp the basic techniques of effective teaching. It may be because of poor training or of good training never absorbed. Second is the teacher with a pressing personal problem, the more common ones being serious illness of a loved one, marital problems, or financial difficulties. The third and most difficult type is the hardheaded marginal teacher who has developed ‘an attitude’. ”
Regardless of the reason for a teacher becoming marginal, encouragement is the key to trying to help them improve. Supervisors must be willing to advise and help them. First, the teacher must be made aware of the specific problem. Then, a strategy can be developed for dealing with the problem.
Sometimes, the best time for strategies to be developed is after a classroom observation. According to C.H. Van der Linde, “The follow-up discussion sometimes provides the most important situation for the collection of further data, because the teachers are now in a situation where they are able to explain their behavior.” Van der Linde goes on to say, “The teacher should be encouraged to give attention to both strong points and deficiencies. Remedies that are realistic should be discussed and steps to promote continuing professional growth should be outlined.”
Some people, such as Francis Duffy, feel that we in education are going about staff development all wrong. Ms. Duffy says, ” Even though we understand that school districts function essentially as systems, we persists in trying to improve schools one teacher at a time.” According to Ms. Duffy’s Knowledge Work Supervision model, teaching would be improved by focusing on the performance of the entire school system rather than just individual teachers.
One thing is certain, no matter what model of evaluation or development a supervisor uses, it is still inevitable to occasionally come across marginal teachers which fail to meet minimal standards no matter what the supervisor does to try to help them improve.
One possible contributing factor to this situation is stress. Education, and particularly educational administration, are very high-stress professions. Clinical supervisors should encourage personal responsibility for stress management. Articulation of the expectation that individuals are to take the responsibility for control of their own stress levels also validates personal inclinations to do the same.

Critical Analysis on Clinical Supervision in Schools

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Police Supervision

Police Supervision.
POLICE SUPERVISION PSPOL – 212 CASE STUDIES IN POLICE SUPERVISION ELIZABETH DIAZ FALL 2012 POLICE SUPERVISION PSPOL – 212 POLICE SUPERVISION CASE STUDY (2A) ELIZABETH DIAZ 10/14/2012 BACKGROUND Police Officer Jacob Goulde is a member of the Town of Utopia Police Department. He’s a married father of two. Officer Goulde has had a very good track record in the nine years he’s worked for the Utopia Police Department, but recently he’s been observed making careless mistakes and his behavior is increasingly disturbing to his supervisor, Sergeant Wentworth.
During the last four or five months, Office Goulde has been turning in his reports late and with many mistakes. He’s called off from work repeatedly, and shown up late to several of his tours, which is an unusual pattern for him. He’s missed an important squad meeting simply because he forgot about it. He’s also forgotten his radio on the roof of his patrol car, he drove off and the radio sustained damage that amounted to over six hundred dollars ($600). After being confronted by Sgt.
Wentworth in a meeting between the two, Officer Goulde was evasive with his answers and confrontational toward his sergeant saying he was “probably coming down with a cold or something” as a way of explanation for his abnormal behavior. As a parting remark he said “get off my back” and left the meeting suddenly. After being assigned desk duty, Desk Sergeant Katz also observed odd behavior from Officer Goulde on his tour. He brought it up to Sergeant Wentworth who then asked Desk Sergeant Katz to put this in writing so that he can take a different course of action with Officer Gould.

ISSUES Mainly the issues that surround this case are the fact that Sergeant Wentworth has observed all of this declining behavior from Office Jacob Goulde and has not immediately intervened to find out the cause of this extreme attitude shift. Sergeant Wentworth should not have had an unofficial meeting with his officer, but instead a more official gathering and offered support to the officer in order to figure out what is causing all of these serious mishaps.
Desk Sergeant Katz is also suffering from the “passing the buck” syndrome. After Officer Goulde was assigned desk duty on his shift, Sgt. Katz should have taken more extreme measures after discovering Officer Goulde drinking from a suspicious looking bottle and later smelling alcohol on his breath. Even though Officer Goulde isn’t his immediate responsibility, in a police department everyone is responsible not only of solving the crime but of holding each other accountable for their errors.
SOLUTION (S) A police officer is held accountable to the highest degree of the law, but a supervisor is held at an even higher standard because they’re in charge of overseeing their subordinates. Sgt. Wentworth has failed to approach the issue when it first started, therefore not being proactive. Now, he’s stuck with this issue and isn’t exactly sure how to follow suit. He must remember that he is the one in command and the one that needs to set rules and guidelines for the subordinates to follow.
Perhaps giving the officer desk duty to be observed closely wasn’t the best idea since he should have been the one to look more closely into this problem with his officer. Sergeant Wentworth should have made Officer Goulde go to mandatory counseling to help him with his problems, whatever they are. If he suffers from any sort of substance abuse or emotional distress, he would get the necessary help through the psych services offered by the department (EIU). Also, they have to set up a plan for the two to meet regularly and discuss the effects of the therapy and map out a route with a mutual goal.
If this problem persists, Sergeant Wentworth has to take the written report by Desk Sergeant Katz and go through the appropriate channels for a formal hearing, that will somewhat force Officer Goulde to answer questions without allowing him any opportunity to walk out. He has already demonstrated that he has no regard for his Sergeant by being evasive and walking out. Sergeant Wentworth has to become a democratic leader in order to aid his subordinates with any problems they’re facing. POLICE SUPERVISION PSPOL – 212 POLICE SUPERVISION CASE STUDY (2B)
ELIZABETH DIAZ 10/14/2012 BACKGROUND Sergeant Wentworth is a sergeant at the Town of Utopia Police Department. After graduating high school and attending at the University of Pleasant, he took the exam for the Utopia Police Department and scored number 3 which landed him a job in 1986. After his probation period ended, he was placed into one of the more productive squads. Sergeant Robert Hulett, who was known as an energetic workaholic, trained Wentworth. He scored number one on the entrance, sergeant and lieutenant examinations for the department.
He was even better known for his ability to train and develop new officers. Wentworth was bright, quick to learn and had very high aspirations about becoming a great officer in this department and was grateful of being trained by Sergeant Hulett. Officer Shapiro has been an officer with the Utopia Police Department since 1971 and is assigned to Squad Z. He is known around the department for being a quiet individual who worked at his own steady pace. The work he turned in contained errors but generally it was done pretty accurately and mostly on time.
Sometimes, Officer Shapiro’s slow manner of speaking and of working irritated his fellow officers and most of all Sergeant Wentworth, who needed him to respond a little more promptly to situations that needed attention. Officer Shapiro’s work attendance was fairly reliable though he never placed punctuality very high on his priority list. Shapiro’s absence last Monday however, caused a great deal of issues to his squad. Several officers had been sent to the Police Range for their firearms qualifications that left the squad short handed for road patrol.
Shapiro didn’t call in until an hour after his shift was supposed to start, to say he wouldn’t make it in to work. Sergeant Wentworth had to cover his shift after speaking to Lieutenant Dunbar, who expressed his disappointment with Wentworth about his mismanaging his staff. Lt. Dunbar became even more infuriated when he learned that the tasks assigned to Sgt. Wentworth had not been completed. Sgt. Wentworth summoned Officer Shapiro to his office on Tuesday and advised him that this situation needs to be rectified or there would be a formal complaint filed against him. ISSUES
Squad Z and Sergeant Wentworth are having serious issues with the work performance of Officer Shapiro and the issues that have risen because of his erratic work attendance. Officer Shapiro’s slow work demeanor presents a serious contrast between the fast pace work environment of his squad. Officer Shapiro’s work attendance has caused serious issues not only for Squad Z but also for Sergeant Wentworth who was reprimanded by Lt. Dunbar. Sgt. Wentworth was forced to cover the shift of Officer Shapiro when most of the squad members were sent off for their firearms qualifications. Lt.
Dunbar expressed his disappointment in Sgt. Wentworth for mismanaging his staff and not keeping proper track of the people he oversees. Although Officer Shapiro’s work is turned in and completed in a timely fashion, it still contains errors and he seems to be suffering from low work morale, which is why he seems unmotivated to be the best officer he can be. After discussing the possible repercussions of this continued behavior with Officer Shapiro he simply shrugged his shoulders and asked to be dismissed, a clear indication that he doesn’t care or isn’t intimidated by a threat of ormal complaints against him. SOLUTION (S) Sgt. Wentworth, as a supervisor has to have the ability to be a decision-maker and set up strict guidelines for his staff to follow. Also, have the correct attitude to train his subordinates. A supervisor cannot criticize his subordinates, but instead needs to create an atmosphere where his officers will want to work efficiently. Sergeant Wentworth has to create a work environment where there is high morale and his officers feel productive and united, and demonstrate he is capable of patience with training the subordinates.
As a supervisor, he has to recognize the necessity of training employees because they are the organization’s most important resource. Sergeant Wentworth should send officer Shapiro for a refresher-training course where his skills will be refreshed and reinforced, to ensure that he is performing to the best of his abilities. His skills play a very important role in the day-to-day smooth operations of his squad. Also, he should set up some time aside to review his work performance until he is satisfied they are up to department standards. POLICE SUPERVISION PSPOL – 212
POLICE SUPERVISION CASE STUDY (3B) ELIZABETH DIAZ 10/14/2012 BACKGROUND As the squad supervisor for Squad Z, Sergeant Wentworth has been concerned with the poor performance of the squad’s officers and the recent drop in summonses and arrests. Sergeant Wentworth has been determined to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of his squad and as a result has decided to arrange a squad meeting and has placed it for the last day of the 8×4 tour of squad Z, to ensure that the whole squad will attend. This meeting is an open forum style to allow everyone to air his or her grievances.
On the day of the meeting, Sgt. Wentworth opened the meeting by inviting everyone to voice their concerns about the reasons why there’s poor performance and lack of productivity coming from this squad. The first one to offer to speak was Officer Lockwood, who has always been someone hard to communicate with. According to Sgt. Wentworth she blames the supervisors for the lack of production from the squad. She went on to say that the faulty radar units purchased by the department are the reason for the decrease in summonses since they’re always in for repairs.
She also expressed that it is the supervisor’s responsibility to provide their officers with working equipment. A remark by Officer Gardenia was very insensitive to Officer Lockwood, who left the room in tears and never returned. Next was Officer Griffin who has issues with several officers who do not clean out the squad cars, then called them “sloppy pigs”. Officers Goulde and Shapiro supported Griffin’s claims stating that maybe they’re dirty because supervisors fail to report them but they also took personal offense to Griffin’s name calling, which then set off several exchanges about sexism and passing the buck.
Sgt. Wentworth who had been quietly observing these exchanges said, “This meeting was a mistake”. Officer McBride, who is usually quiet, spoke and said that the supervisors never really listen to their complaints. She also went on to say that in several occasions they’ve reported the faulty equipment, the conditions of the squad cars and that the morale on the squad has fallen dangerously low. Officer Griffin agrees with Officer McBride’s claims saying he believes the supervisors are only interested in productivity and not listening to what they have to say.
Sgt. Wentworth promised that he would take seriously the claims he’s heard today. He then thanked Officer McBride for voicing her opinion and she stated that it’s only the tip of the iceberg and that there are other more serious things going on in this department than he realizes. She advised him to patrol the streets and check on what his officers are doing. ISSUES The main issues in this case study are the lack of productivity and decrease in arrests/summonses of Squad Z. There is an obvious underlying reason as to why this squad’s morale has taken a nosedive.
Sergeant Wentworth’s demeanor during the squad meeting was unnerving. He should have never allowed Officer Gardenia to speak to Officer Lockwood in such a way. If his intention was to hear the issues of his officers then he should have never allowed these shouting matches to go on in his presence. Although Officer Griffin’s concerns were valid he shouldn’t have let him go at it with Officers Goulde and Shapiro. Lastly, he shouldn’t have said that the meeting was a mistake, that’s not reflective of a leader. He should’ve considered that the meeting wouldn’t just go smoothly.
In fact, he should’ve prepared himself for several possible outcomes of the meeting, that’s what a true leader does. Clearly there are serious issues that aren’t being handled by supervisors in order to restore morale and productivity to this squad. Sergeant Wentworth should’ve have undermined Sergeant McBride by telling her she’d only been here a little while when she intended to give him further perspective about the real issues going on around the squad. Sgt. Wentworth needs to stop the buck here. SOLUTION (S) In order to solve the issues that plague Squad Z, Sgt.
Wentworth needs to sit down and make a plan that will show goals he wants for the squad and a time frame in which they must be done by. He has to consider the claims made by his officers and take them seriously. This is the moment when he has to become a Democratic Leader and seek ideas from his subordinates to ensure that these problems are eradicated. Sergeant Wentworth has to lead by example and treat his subordinates as colleagues, as oppose to trying to exert his will over them. He should make it mandatory that his officers attend a team-building seminar to bring his quad together and help them communicate with each other better and therefore making them better communicators toward their supervisors. Sergeant Wentworth seems to not take seriously the internal complaints of his officers, but this should be so. A supervisor’s job is to take serious and show importance to all complaints no matter how important or not they seem to him, because clearly it is important to his subordinate. Sergeant Wentworth needs to work on paying close attention to these complaints, as they seem to be the start of the bigger issues.
POLICE SUPERVISION PSPOL – 212 POLICE SUPERVISION CASE STUDY (4B) ELIZABETH DIAZ 10/14/2012 BACKGROUND Sergeant Wentworth went out on patrol shortly after twelve midnight, when he observed two patrol cars parked side by side in an alleyway. After approaching the cars, he asked officer Shapiro and Ashford what they were doing outside their sectors. Officer Shapiro replied they were just talking about where they would meet up later in their shift, which is in clear violation of the regulations set forth by the Utopia Police Department.
Sgt. Wentworth sent them both on their way. As he continued to patrol the town, he heard dispatch call patrol car 91 for several minutes. Without response, dispatch gave the call to patrol car 92, which was in a different sector. Sgt. Wentworth called headquarters and asked what was car 91’s last known location and went in search of it. He tried to locate car 91 and the officer but neither could be found. Officer Ashford, of car 92, told the Sergeant that some cars went on to Castle Avenue to sleep.

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