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Pygmalion: Social Class and Liza

Pygmalion: Social Class and Liza.
1. Significance of Title: The significance of the title, ”Pygmalion” is in Greek mythology, The town Cyprus Pygmalion was a king who deeply fell in love with the statue of Aphrodite. Pygmalion had pictured nothing but beauty in his mind. He worked many countless days and nights in search of loveliness beyond his powers of expression. The statue got the life, in his quest for ideal beauty and divine’s grace. Over time the two were married and he gave her the name Galatea. In contrast to Shaw’s play, “Pygmalion” professor Higgins the scientist of phonetics is a Pygmalion and a convent garden flower girl Eliza is a Galatea the statue, who will be later transformed by Higgins into an upper class lady. Though Higgins creates a new Liza, he doesn’t marry her unlike the Greek legend. The title has mythic and suggestive appeal to it.
2. Setting: The setting of Pygmalion is set in England around the late 1800s and early 1900s. Why Shaw chose this setting, it is when and where he lived, but it is important to the story in many ways. He was an active socialist, in many of his novels they were based on social and political issues like capitalism and socialism. In Pygmalion, Shaw lays down his beliefs and teaches us about society in the early 1900s. This was a time when people were just starting to be able to move up in society, if you were poor at birth, you could raise yourself to a higher level by working hard, like Liza. Women were finally starting to be considered more than just the homebuilders; they were starting to be viewed as the heart of the family.
Shaw supported the idea that women should get the same opportunities as men, also he believed strongly in equality for all mankind. In this story it tells about a working young lady who gets an opportunity to become upper class lady. Throughout the novel, Shaw keeps the contrast between working class and the middle class by using strong characters from both sectors. The setting provides events and opinions from both sides of class divided. When the two different worlds are clashed together the results are interesting. England is also a major part of the setting, because it had a more rigid social structure at the time of the story than America did. It was easier to spot the differences that kept Liza stapled to the gutter of society.

3. Theme: There are many themes in this novel. One of themes is Professionalism, the idea of female professions were somewhat new, in this time period. Women were generally housewives before this period and there is some resistance to the idea of that male professions being entered by females. When Liza opening a flower shop and she comes from the lower class, it’s almost treating to the males because it’s one job that the female took away from them. Gentility and Manners is another theme. The upper class was associated with mostly good manners. The author’s position on manners was a bit unclear.
Since he’s a socialist, a person might think he wouldn’t have no time for them because they are a maker of class divisions. Though Pickering’s treating everyone like a duchess, while Higgins’s pattern is treating everyone like trash. At the end of the novel Liza thanks Pickering for teaching her manners; if it wasn’t for him she would have never learned them. Change and Transformation is also another theme. The central theme and plot of the novel is the transformation of Liza. At first it appears to rest in the power Higgins expresses buy achieving his transformation. He quotes, “How frightfully interesting it is to take a human being and change her into a quite different human being by creating a new speech for her.” Liza becomes the central in the play. The learning of independence and the sense of inner self-worth is the true importance that allows her to leave Higgins.
4. Characters: Liza Doolittle is around eighteen and twenty years of age, a cockney flower girl who is energetic and street-smart. She is intelligent though was not educated by the traditional standards. Innocent vanity and consequential air describe the deplorable figure. Liza is a quick learner, who learns a genteel accent from Higgins’s and washed and dressed exquisitely as a duchess. As she is transformed, she is shocked that Higgins has lost interest in her afterwards. Liza notices the difference between a flower girl and a lady and she learns that the social graces and class not the true measure of a person’s worth.
Henry Higgins is described as, “a robust, vital appetizing sort of man”, also an energetic scientific type. He is an expert in the phonetics and the author of, “Higgins’s Universal Alphabet.” His manners range from genial bullying. When he transformed Liza, he is shaken by the independence Liza demonstrates and by the end of the play Higgins is able to respect her. Another character is Alfred Doolittle is an elderly but vigorous man. He thinks he deserves as much as others Though never gets anything because the disapproval of middle class morality. Alfred is a moocher that finesses loans from the most miserly of people.
5. Conflicts: There are several conflicts in this play. Higgins and Colonel Pickering have a playful “bet” that Higgins can’t make the flower girl speak and act like a duchess. There is the issue of what we actually hear and say as opposed to what we think we hear and say. Higgins transforms the flower girl into an upper class duchess, and this is why Higgins forgets about her as soon as transformed her because he won the bet. Another conflict was that Liza Doolittle wants to better herself in life, than just be a lower class flower girl but is rather stuck in her position since her income fluctuates and her education is limited. This conflict is solved when Liza decides to open her own flower show, because that is what she knows how to do. Plus she enjoys it.
6. Symbolism and Imagery: One of the symbols in this play is chocolate. Higgins loves chocolate; while he does his studies he displays them on desk. He tried to Convince her Liza to be transformed into a duchess, he lures her with chocolate. She takes a bite of half of one. Before she can reply he pops one in his mouth. In the chocolate dish before leaving his house, Liza leaves a sentimental ring given to her by him.
Liza taking a bite of chocolate represents trust. Money would be another symbol because it defines the difference between lower, middle, upper class depending how much money you have. The ring is also another symbol. Usually a ring symbolizes love and marriage though Higgins and Liza were never together; she leaves the ring by the chocolate dish. This indicates that she doesn’t trust him no more, since she left the ring by the chocolates and that she doesn’t have any more feelings for him. Eliza has now moved on.
7. Author’s style: Shaw’s style in his novel, “Pygmalion” is Intellect vs. Entertainment Shaw not only wants to just entertain his audience, he also wants them to learn about social issues. Usually theatre plays are strictly to just entertain; Shaw adds his own twist to it (to learn as well). Rather than dramatic tension, his plays do tend toward discussion. Shaw understood what made plays theatrical that’s why he succeeded in his plays. His belief in the need for social improvement didn’t however discourage him for adding humor into his plays. Pygmalion most people would think that his novel would have to do with romance but it doesn’t at all. After reading the novel you might interpret that it is a romance novel, because Eliza and Higgins. Romance has been distinguished as exotic, exaggerated narratives and idealized characters. And Pygmalion is a romance not the typical one but because of the magical transformation throughout the play.
8. Key Quotations:” A woman who utters such depressing and disgusting sounds has no right to be anywhere – no right to live” (Act.1 ) By this quote Higgins does accept all the class divisions. He believes that since Liza didn’t inherit in being an upper class lady, only he can bestow worth upon her, by helping her become a lady in society’s eyes. ”You don’t care. I know you don’t care. You wouldn’t care if I was dead. I’m nothing to you-not so much as them slippers” (Act4 pg64) This shows Liza’s transformation and how it changed her, they even though she completely changed in appearance deep down she is nothing like Higgins or any upper class person.
She has a different way of explaining things and she wants to be her own person, but still use the traits of an upper class lady. “You are certainly are a pretty pair of babies, playing with your live doll”(Act3 pg.53) Mrs. Higgins doesn’t agree with what her husband is doing with Liza, at first she was somewhat okay with the idea, but now she thinks it’s wrong because he going to have nothing to do with her afterwards.

Pygmalion: Social Class and Liza

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Social Class

The Struggle between Social Classes

The Struggle between Social Classes.
Rich girl marrying a poor boy or vice versa—this is a very recurrent theme in love stories of all times. In the film genre, this theme also serves as a topic of interest as it reveals the conflict between the upper and the lower classes in society. In Jack Clayton’s (1959) film, Room at the Top, the director shows how the struggle between the two classes operates in the British society after the World War II. Depicting a poor man’s struggle as he tries to alter his place in society, the film attempts to mirror the reality that the poor will likely give in to the intention of the rich in view of economic struggle.

Analysis of the characterisation, plot, theme, and motifs used in the film provides viewers a better knowledge of the two social classes. Characterisation The beginning of the film strongly suggests representations of the lower class. The main character, Joe Lampton (played by Laurence Harvey) is depicted sitting comfortably on a train, with his feet raised on the opposite seat, thus showing his mended socks. The introduction alone shows the man’s class standing, as he cannot afford to buy a new pair of socks, and resorts instead to wearing an old and tottered pair.

This attitude of settling with the second best or whatever is available is reflected in his choice of women. Realising the difficulty of having Susan Brown as his girl due to the conflict in their social standing, Joe resorts to Alice Aisgill (played by Simone Signoret), his colleague, despite their big age difference. A number of juxtapositions are presented in the film. For instance, in spite of Joe’s financial incapability as symbolised by the socks, he wears the usual coat and tie as he reports for work.
Whilst the first denotes poverty, the other suggests decency. Note that the coat and tie is customary in the British society especially in business affairs. As such, he and his colleagues wear the same type of clothing, which somehow levels off their status with that of the rich. Nevertheless, this does not change Joe’s social standing, and the way Susan’s family and friends view him. Based on his position as an accountant in Borough’s Treasurer’s Department, Joe is unquestionably educated.
However, this does not necessarily help raise his social status as one belonging to the working class. This implies that it is not enough for a person to obtain education and a white-collared job in order to rise in the social hierarchy. Rather, marriage to a rich girl such as Susan, the daughter of a factory owner, could change one’s fortune as proposed later in the film. Juxtaposition is likewise established between the characters. For instance, Joe’s character is presented in opposition with Susan’s suitor, who is influential and sociable.
Joe, being a newcomer in the Dufton, seldom socialises with his colleagues, and instead relates closely with a few of them, including Alice, whom he falls in love with later. He is also seen in contrast with Susan, the girl who attracts him a lot. Their social standing primarily draws the line between them. Whilst Joe needs to work hard and establish connection with his colleagues, Susan does not need to work, and instead spends her time acting in local theatre. Also, whilst Joe transfers to Dufton to obtain employment, Susan is free to go on vacation as she pleases.
Moreover, juxtaposition is also established between the two female characters, Alice and Susan. Aside from the women’s ages and marital status, they also differ in social status, in that Alice is an average office worker, whilst Susan is the daughter of an owner of a factory. This social difference between the two results in a struggle between them as Susan gets pregnant. Although Joe loves Alice more, and has planned to marry her, Mr. Brown’s (Susan’s father) proposition convinces Joe to change his mind, thus making way for the bourgeois to win over the proletarian.
In addition, Alice’s former marriage to their colleague also makes less favourable, especially since her former husband would not agree to divorce. Considering this, the film does not only present struggles between social classes; it also demonstrates struggles based on gender as the women’s fate depends on Joe’s final decision. Further to the contrast between Alice and Susan, the former demonstrates more freedom of will, as she does things she likes, ie, shifts career, separates from her husband, and establishes relationship with Joe.
Her habit of cigarette smoking throughout the film shows Alice’s easy-going and independent character; although it reflects her tensions in life at the same time. In contrast, Susan is pictured as a fresh and young girl, healthy-looking and innocent. Her social status prevents her from associating with the lower class, such as Joe, but it does not ultimately defeats her will to be independent. Plot The plot of the film supports the idea of struggle between the social classes. It shows a single unified structure, with the conflict appearing near the end, as Joe decides to marry Susan due to the latter’s pregnant condition.
His decision conflicts with his wish to marry Alice. Thus, when the latter finds out, she gets totally devastated, and drowns in her sorrow and alcohol, which later leads to her death by car accident. Earlier in the story, Susan’s parents try to separate her from Joe by making her take a vacation. This motive demonstrates the struggle between social classes, in that the bourgeois discriminates the other, by preventing marriage between them. Later on, as Mr. Brown realises his daughter’s condition, he tries to buy off Joe, and offers to make him rich if Joe does what he commands.
Initially, Joe exercises his pride and rejects the offer, but realising that Alice cannot be married with him, and that life with Susan would make his life comfortable, he agrees to the proposition and marries Susan. As such, the class struggle is evident. Mr. Brown uses his money and power to buy off Joe. For his part, Joe cannot disagree with Mr. Brown for he sees this opportunity to escape his current social status. Being Susan’s husband, Joe does not need to work anymore, and all else will go smoothly because Susan is very wealthy.
However, just as Joe attempts to escape his own social structure, he is haunted by it, with the death of Alice. Along with the proposition of Mr. Brown to make Joe a rich man is the defeat of the proletarian class. As Joe accepts the offer, he disremembers Alice’s sacrifices and love for him. What is sadder about it is knowing how little time it takes Joe to decide about leaving Alice. As shown in the film, everything happens over one dinner, too short a time to change plans or think things over; thus implying the power of money to further establish social injustice and discrimination, and in turn disregard social equality.
Theme The main theme of the film, which is the struggle between social structures, relates to Marxist perspectives. Specifically, the presence of the two opposing structures, the bourgeois (as presented by Susan and her family) and the proletarian (Joe, Alice, and the other employees) implies the conflict in the film. As Marx & Engels (1848) claim, there is a social struggle that exists between the bourgeois or the middle class, “that sprouted from the ruins of feudal society,” and “established new classes, new conditions of oppression, new forms of struggle in place of the old ones.
” In the film, as Mr. Brown gives Joe the marriage proposal, he implies designing Joe’s entire life—his marriage and career, in order to make sure it fits the structure that Susan is born with. Such plan illustrates “a new condition of oppression,” a new form of struggle for the proletarian. Physical attraction is what leads to the theme of social struggle. Everything starts as Joe becomes attracted to Susan and vice versa. Indeed, the two social classes would not conflict with each other if not for Joe’s feelings for Susan.
In this consideration, one may see that the effort to reach or blend with another social class may result in a much worse conflict between them. However, such conflict could later lead to “permanently changing social relations within the system” (Strasser and Randall, 1981, p. 44). Thus, Susan’s pregnancy leads to “the development of new patterns of social relations,” between him and the Browns. Suddenly, Susan’s parents accept Joe as their daughter’s husband, owing to the reputation that they try to maintain in society.
Motifs As mentioned above, the proletarian or working class is given focus in the film. Clayton uses realistic setting and motifs to depict the lives of the working class of the 50s. Amongst these include the dark, small houses where Alice and Joe spend their love affair, the male boarding house where Joe resides with her friend Soames, the local train which characterises the transportation means of the common people, and Joe’s seemingly abandoned house where he brings Susan the night they elope.
The use of realistic setting thus emphasises the life lived by the proletarians. Juxtaposition is likewise applied to the setting. When Joe visits Susan, he is amazed by the huge house, which consists of the long halls, partitioned rooms, and the big lawn. Servants are available any moment they are needed. This is in full contrast with Alice’s place, which is dark and small. Aside from setting, the behaviour of the characters likewise mimics the ways of the working class.
For instance, cigarette smoking is used vehemently throughout the film, giving impression of the start of the “new wave” era (Wickham, n. d. ), although such practices may be deemed destructive of the image of the working class. Likewise, the affair between workers despite being committed is also hinted on, which reveals the low regard for morality of the said social class. Furthermore, the Alice’s fate at the end also reveals the proletarian’s lack of strength to face reality, the tendency to be alcoholic, and the low self-esteem amongst them.
In contrast, the ways of the bourgeois are seen in better light. They are dressed neatly on each occasion; specifically, Susan’s mother shows modesty by the way she behaves and carries herself even whilst at home, whilst Susan shows coyness towards Joe. However, the proletarians are pictured with more social dynamics than their counterpart. This is seen as Soemes introduces Joe to their officemates. Everyone, despite their positions in the company, welcomes Joe with glee, whilst Susan’s suitor intimidates him.
During the party where Joe and Susan meet again, the guests seated with the Browns look at Joe with contempt, after finding out that he does not belong to their social circle. In sum, whilst the proletarians are depicted as misguided and weak, the bourgeois are seen as virulent and vile. The monotonous music that the director employs does not entirely affect the whole of the film, yet it helps highlight important scenes such as the introduction, the falling in love and break up between Joe and Alice, the news about Alice’s death, the wedding, etc.
Likewise, the actors’ costumes, which are limited to office and home settings, depict the simplicity of the people in the 50s. The director’s effort to make everything look realistic, from the setting, the costumes, the love scenes, the dialogues to the props, allows the viewers to see the film in a realistic perspective. Moreover, the plot structure, which shows the dilemma of a man in choosing between the woman he loves but cannot possess and the woman who merely attracts her but is prepared to be his wife, adds to the realism of the film.
The only element that seems irrelevant yet not impossible is the time when Joe encounters the mob just before his wedding. This scene is irrelevant to the plot, but may have been added to achieve catharsis. Since Joe is the cause of Alice’s accidental death, he is made to pay for what he does before he marries Susan. Despite the irrelevance of the mob scene to the plot, it nevertheless presents other aspects of the proletarians.
As depicted in the film, the men that beat Joe are not scavengers; rather, they are working men, considering the way they are dressed up. Based on this scene, the proletarians in the British society are pictured as ruthless just like the bourgeois who would buy off people’s freedom in order to make their daughter happy. As Joe decides to leave Alice for Susan, the film once again shows that in the face of struggle between the two classes, it is usually those in the upper class that emerge as the winner, leaving behind the poor at the losing end.
References Marx, K. & Engels, F. (1848) The manifesto, Available at <http://www. anu. edu. au/polsci/marx/classics/manifesto. html> [Accessed on 23rd July 2009]. Room at the Top (1959) Directed by Jack Clayton, London, British Lion Films
[video:DVD]
. Strasser, H. & Randall, S. (1981) An introduction to theories of social change. London, Routledge. Wickham, P. (N. d. ). Room at the Top (1958). Available at <http://www. screenonline. org. uk/film/id/440778/> [Accessed on 23rd July 2009].

The Struggle between Social Classes

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Differences in Worldview Exhibited by the Different Social Classes

Differences in Worldview Exhibited by the Different Social Classes.
Humans are social animals. They can not live alone in this world all by themselves. All humans need other humans in order to live their lives properly. They might be able to live without fulfilling their emotional desires etc but they can certainly not live without fulfilling certain material needs such as food. For example, even if a person manages to live without friends and family who fulfill emotional needs and needs of belongingness, he will not be able to live properly without the farmer who grows food or the barber who cuts his hair.
Thus, humans live in large groups of people where different people perform different duties and make each other’s lives simpler, easier and better to live. If one person does something, he needs the other one to do something else and this way, they exchange the benefits of performing one task rather properly instead of doing many things in a haphazard manner. These groups of people are called societies. Societies are the basis of lifestyles and cultures (Fiona, 1997). However, this all is not that simple.
Some humans in the societies are much better off than many others while, in contrast, some are way below the line. Some enjoy best opportunities of life while some don’t even have proper food to eat. Hence, there exists a whole system of social classes in which there are various blocks or sub-groups of people based upon various factors like income brackets, life styles, cultures, religions, nationalities and so on. (Crothers, 1996) Social Classes These social classes perform various different duties in the societies and have entirely different lifestyles and outlook of life.

These classes live physically in the same world, but in actuality, their worlds are absolutely different. In fact, different is a very weak a word to describe how apart they are. The people belonging to these classes have entirely different world views and perceive the world totally differently depending on there life styles and circumstances. Although different types of societies are divided into various kinds of social classes, in its essence, there are three basic social classes based on the income levels that exist in almost every society (Fiona, 1997).
These societies are (Crothers, 1996): • Upper Class (The Elite) • Middle Class (The Moderate) • Lower Class (The Poor) These classes do not exist in isolation, but are intermingled. Moreover, it is more like a continuum, that is, transition classes like Upper-Middle Class exist as well. These are the class differences that advertisers should be aware of in targeting different classes of people. World Views Exhibited by Social Classes The perception of the world, by the social classes, varies widely.
The rich people have no idea what poverty is and what is it like to earn living on a daily basis. The Upper Class or the Elite people sit at the executive positions giving orders to the working class (The Middle and Lower Classes). To the rich, the world is heaven where they can whatever they want, whenever they want, however they want. They just wish for it and bingo! Generally they disregard the poor, as if it is their birth right to be rich. Whatever they do is right and they have they right to exploit everyone and everything below them. (Summer, 2008)
In contrast, the working class’s life revolves around work and is spent struggling balancing work and life. However, the life of middle class (generally the educated portion of the working class) is comparatively easier than that of the lower class (mostly uneducated or poorly educated). The middle class people live a comparatively moderate life when it comes to income and fulfillment of desires (Crothers, 2008). They perceive the world to be generally uncomfortable but not like hell.
For them, there is misery, exploitation and tough luck in this world, but there is a ray of hope as well, since due to their education and experiences, they do have a chance to work hard and jump up to the upper class. Out of all classes, the lower class is the one which suffers the most in these and other dimensions. For them, there is very rarely a ray of hope of getting any better. To them, the world is like hell, full of miseries, poverty and exploitation (be it social, moral, political or any other exploitation) and life can never be good no matter how hard they try.(OCLC, 1971)
Conclusion
Therefore, I conclude, that although these social classes exist in the same world under the same sun, the perception that they have of this world is entirely different. The rich continue to exploit the poor while the poor keep on being exploited, living in disappointments, doing nothing about it. The rich has absolutely no idea what poor goes through, each and every single day while the poor has no clue to what it is like to be rich. (Summer, 2008)

Differences in Worldview Exhibited by the Different Social Classes

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Describe How Poverty, Social Class

Describe How Poverty, Social Class.
U30 (P2) Health Psychology Describe 3 factors such as culture social class, gender, poverty and education may influence the way people respond to health and illness Poverty Imam’s house Individuals who are in poverty are more likely focused on the physiological l needs out of the hierarchy pyramid. My case study is sourced from BBC documentary, toughest place to be a bin man and is about a man called Imam Syaffi. Syaffi is 28 and lives in Indonesia with a monthly income of ? 8 by working six days a week from 6am to midnight as a rubbish collector and running extra errands for his wealthy neighbours as well as sorting and selling recycled rubbish. Imam lives in a shanty village with his wife, son and parents and their home is near to the mini landfill where Imam’s rubbish that he collects is transferred to a bigger landfill but it rarely does. Imam’s wages cover rent and small amount of food. Other luxuries are what Imam finds in the rubbish such as used shelves, mattresses and chairs.
Imam’s home is a giant health hazard as the rubbish near his house causes disease and encourages mosquitoes, flies and rats to infect the village, himself and his family. However, Indonesian government don’t supply health care like in England causing Imam to risk the possibilities of catching malaria, streptobacillosis or worse. Imam’s influences on poverty make him choose to supply the physiological needs of paying rent and food than constantly supply ways to protect his and family’s health and pay expensive medical bills.
Also, Imam finds it hard to provide healthcare for his family because upper classes can easily call authorities to make him unemployed if he isn’t doing his job properly if he needs to take the day off to take his wife to the hospital. However, Imam’s secret shows that he sneakily shows the upper-class that his cart is broken and unable to work by pulling out a tyre so he can take an occasional day off for the family.

Also, Imam’s dedication to provide for the family by working over 12 hours each day can make him very stressed and tired which can causes him to have poor health but he would rather work more hours if he could so he could provide more luxuries for his family. Furthermore, the food Imam can buy with his salary shows that he can only afford basic foods such as milk for the son, water, rice and rare portions of meat and vegetables so that leads to poor nutrition compared to English rubbish collector Wilbur Ramirez from the documentary who has a better life but has the same job title as Imam.
Social Class Contrasting from my discussion about poverty I want to make a case study upon Wilbur Ramirez. Wilbur Ramirez job title is similar to Imam Syaffi but because his social class is higher than Imam that means that Wilbur escapes from being in serious poverty. Wilbur monthly salary is ? 1,700 and manages to live in Hammersmith, west London with his wife and three children. Hammersmith is decent area for families to live in London and quoted by a local, ‘I can’t think of anywhere better to be a child than one of London’s inner suburbs like Hammersmith’.
Wilbur’s hierarchy of needs are very different than Imam as he’ll be marked to fulfilling up to self-accusation because all the other needs are met because of his lifestyle as a working class English citizen. Wilbur’s job as bin man is less stressful due to shorter shifts than Imam and better pay which reduces risk of heart disease or tiredness. This means Wilbur is able to afford house bills as well as to provide for his family and buy extra luxuries.
Therefore, I believe his opinion on health and illness would be more focused about how he looks after himself by being trained by his employer to use the uniform when touching rubbish by always wearing gloves. Also, England’s public health and NHS targets people like Wilbur to be constantly cautious about their health unlike the rest of the world like Indonesia. Therefore, Wilbur would be cautious about giving his family good nutrition and easily receive professional health care because its tax paid. Picture of Imam (left) and Wilbur (right) Culture
Different cultures in general effects our responses to health and gives our opinion on what causes illness, how it’s treated, who should we seek for assistance? In the industrialised world in USA it sees’ disease as a form of a negative substance infecting the body that can be treated with medicine or hospital equipment to diagnose and treat the patient from the disease. However, other cultures believe that disease is caused by a paranormal activity and prayers, spiritual rituals or visiting a witch doctor would release the disease out of the body and destroyed by a higher authority.
This shows that health professionals should give patient compliance due to the sensitivity of one’s culture. Studies of group of Cambodian patients were reassured throughout their therapy by understanding how the medicines and the body work due to lack of education. However, since 2010 the quality of health is rising in Cambodia to increase the life expectancy and making awareness towards HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases but in Ratanakiri, Cambodia is receiving the worst healthcare causing endemic case of malaria, tuberculosis, intestinal parasites, cholera, diarrhoea and measles.
Also, maternal/ child mortality and severe malnutrition are issues that causes poor health and illness. Ratanakiri locals are most likely to respond to their faith which is most likely to be Buddhism to gain better health than modern health care. In Buddhism it’s believed that a person suffering from physical disease also suffers from a poor mindset therefore they have to devote their entire life to their faith and releases what poisoned their body; greed, anger and ignorance to heal the illness.
However, modern health care is accessible in this province but the medical equipment and supplies are minimal and the staff are poorly trained and irregularly paid. This gives mistrust for the locals to use professional help as they’re in risk to receive the incorrect care and other hospitals are far away near the big cities. Therefore, it’s most likely that in Ratanakiri; diseases are known to be paranormal spirit filled with greed, anger and ignorance than a biological infected substance.
However in more industrialised places in Cambodia they’ll believe the opposite due to better education, healthcare and scientific awareness. Ratanakiri Hospital ——————————————– [ 1 ]. http://www. youtube. com/watch? v=6EWLQw9TiCM [ 2 ]. http://www. bbc. co. uk/programmes/b01bmtfx/participants/imam-syaffi [ 3 ]. http://www. bbc. co. uk/programmes/b01bmtfx/features/contrast-binmen [ 4 ]. http://www. fodors. com/community/europe/is-hammersmith-a-good-area-of-london. cfm [ 5 ]. http://www. euromedinfo. eu/how-culture-influences-health-beliefs. html/ [ 6 ].

Describe How Poverty, Social Class

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Ideology, Ethnicity, Social Class, and Gender

Ideology, Ethnicity, Social Class, and Gender.
Culture is defined as the systematic philosophy of life or as the behaviour, beliefs and symbols that people accept. These customs passed from one generation to the other because it transforms their behaviour and character. Cultural studies include political economy, communication, social theory, literary theory, media theory etc.
The study mainly focuses on how a particular phenomenon relates to ideology, ethnicity, social class and gender. Culture also plays an important role in art and literature. Raymond William’s “cultural materialism” plays a dominant role in the field of cultural studies. William’s definition of culture is apt and significant in this connection:
Culture is one of the two or three complicated words in English. This is so partly because of its intricate historical development in several European languages, but mainly because it has now come to be used for important concepts in several distinct intellectual disciplines and in several distinct and incompatible system of thought. (William 76)

The process of culture has become so powerful that it decides the identity of a man on the one hand and on the other hand it assimilates the different cultures in a single thread. If we talk about the relevance of culture in the perspective of present scenario it is more complex than earlier. The impact of globalization has increased the cultural differences. Due to culture studies, society has undergone many changes such as the change in life style, behaviour, perception and religion etc.
As due to the effect of globalization though people are getting appreciation, education and knowledge but they are losing their customs and traditions which were the boon to them. Our culture is decaying because people are neglecting their traditions, manners and customs. They are adopting the western culture blindly without knowing whether it is good or bad. If we want to live happily we have to bring our culture back.
So, in this paper, I am taking up Rita Garg’s novel, An Abbreviated Child: Gloom to Bloom and have tried to trace the decay in culture through different characters of the novel. The culture does not have a fixed definition; it changes from time to time, generation to generation.
The novelist, very aptly describes the condition of the poor folk who are passing their life in pain and sufferance because they don’t get opportunities and life is stuck for them. Any attempt made to get over, sticks their feet and hands in their misery-woven net. In this novel, the setting covers the land from Canada and America to Delhi and Uttarakhand. The folk talked about belong to the Shivalik Hills, the border hilly area. Incidentally, this hill range also has Jaunsar Babar area where Draupadi was married to the Pandava brothers in the Mahabharata. The Shivalik hill range has constraints of its own type and that is projected well but in precise language by the novelist.
This area has more of labour class and the labouring women keep doing their job. Nonetheless, they have to cut short the time to be given to children; consequentially, the child may or may not grow to the proper circumstances in life. Kalia, the villainy following man, was born as a handsome and active boy but also naughty. His labour class mother often made the child lick opium so that she would be working and the child would sleep quietly and not face hazards at such sites as quarry, damn or landslide.
As a matter of fact, this practice, in this area of hills, produces not one but many Kalias. The poor women practise this on their children and the latter become alcoholics. Kalia gets used to drinks and dies early. Prior to his death, he sells his sister Gauri, for Income Tax free Rs. 20,000. All the time he needs money. This act of Kalia is not uncommon. This hillside is known for the payment made by the groom. Here, the buyer of Gauri makes her work as an animal to plough the farm and to work as a woman otherwise.
Status of women in hill states is quite different due to prevailing topographical and geographical condition where woman are involved in more physical activities outside home like work in the fields, orchards, and rearing animal and also engaged in small cottage industries. More and more women are also holding jobs in government offices and private sector as well. Besides, their role has become important in decision making, planning and execution our rural development schemes. (Indian Journal of Public Administration)
This entire novel deals with the dismal scene of poverty and over population. Under these circumstances, the effort to uplift the poor through education and employment are worth acclamation. To improve upon further, some individuals ought to come forward and help the needy. No matter, at what level. Here the novelist talks of an orphanage run by Mrs Preet Rani. Over here, many orphans are given proper care. As per the talent, they achieve the difficult goals.
This region of Shivalik Hills is not prosperous. To fight poverty, both men and women work. In this race, the young children suffer. Their sufferings of childhood follow them till late ages. An easy way to keep the son under control is to control the senses. This is so widespread that no one minds this and no one pays heed to check the practice. The long practice has become the part of culture even. It is taken for granted that such a life style is normal.
The repercussions are too much. The character of Kalia suffices to prove this. In his case, it was his mother who used to make him lick opium when her mother-in-law was unwell. The permanent loss out of the event is that the abbreviation of the child is a natural outcome. The growth of a race depends on the strength of the entire community. A weak race is no race. Rather this is to mar the race or the culture.

Ideology, Ethnicity, Social Class, and Gender

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Archeological Models for Social Classification

Archeological Models for Social Classification.

The essay looks at the Cadbury Castle and surrounds, developed in the Late Bronze and Early Iron Aga, using a theoretical model developed by Service (1962), the Elmans Service Fourfold Classification, to elaborate upon the social organisation of the fort and its environment.As the Castle is usually looked at in isolation from its surroundings, this is a relatively novel approach. The site has attracted considerable architectural interest, and is also a tourist attraction in Somerset.
The essay uses the Fourfold Classification to analyse the Castle as seen in the context of the surrounding area, particularly its role in association with changes in social structure.Social hierarchy is evident from Early Iron Age, and division of communities in terms of different functions and social relations is also evident.Early hunter-gatherers with low population density gave way to changing social systems during the Bronze period. By the Romano-British period, there were signs of groups living more independently with different ways of living. Traces of artistic and religious activity are also found from earliest times, and the significance of these discussed.A movement over time from a classless community of local dwellers to a more highly structured social arrangement is traced, and comparisons made between these early eras and contemporary times.
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Title: Using archaeological models for social classification and settlement patterning explain how far the available archaeological evidence reveals developments in the social organisation of any one location in prehistoric Wessex
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Archeological Models for Social Classification

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Education and Social Class Differences

Education and Social Class Differences.
What is the role of women in the story of Persepolis? Compare and contrast the various women in some detail using at least three examples: you might include Marji, her mother, her grandmother, her school teachers, the maid, the neighbors, or the guardians of the revolution. In the story of Persepolis, each female character had a designated role that they could not escape from. Marji’s role was to show the reader how the Iranian Revolution truely affected her life.
An example of this was when the government made it mandatory for all women to wear veils. Marji did not have a choice in the matter because she was young and had to abide by her parent’s requests, but more so when she had to wear the veil to school and was stopped by the guardians of the revolution. Marji’s mother’s role was to support Marji and be there for her to express what she was feeling. However, her mother also had to make sure she was well off in her endevours.
Her mother was much more direct and stern with Marji as compared to her grandmother. Her grandmother’s role was also to support Marji, but she also tried to calm Marji by giving her words of wisdom, which included a slight insight to what has occurred in the past and some events that were once hidden from her. The maid in the household did not attempt to take on any of the roles of the females because her primary role to the reader was to show us the social class differences that existed within that society.

She was nothing more than a maid who must know her place. The school teacher’s role was held higher than that of the maid’s role. The school teacher was there to educate all of the students, but part of this education was to ensure that all of the female students that were attending would wear their veils at all times because if they did not, the guardians of the revolution would have them arrested.

Education and Social Class Differences

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Five Social Classes And Consequence Of Their

Five Social Classes And Consequence Of Their.
When sociologists talk of social class, they refer to a group of individuals who occupy a similar position in the economic system of production. Within that system occupation is very important because it provides financial rewards, stability and benefits like healthcare.Social classes are very complex, but “the relationship between power and wealth is undeniable.” (Marger 40) People can change the social class they are in, but it is not simply one factor that determines one’s social class. Occupation, income, wealth, education, and status are all major factors that can help determine which of the five social classes a person belongs. An individual can change his or her social class if they have the desire to do so
Many sociologists suggest five:
Upper Class – Elite

Represent institutional leadership, heads of multinational corporations, foundations, universities Capitalist elite – owners of lands, stocks and bonds and other assets – wealth derived from what they own Forbes magazine publishes a list of the 400 wealthiest families in America. In 1997, net worth had to be at least $475 million.Bill Gates, in that year, had net worth pf 39.8 billion. Of all the wealth represented on the Forbes list, more than half is inherited. Newly acquired wealth, nouveau riche, have vast amounts of money but not often accepted into “old money” circles.
Upper Middle Class
Represent scientific and technical knowledge – engineers, accountants, lawyers, architects, university faculty, managers and directors of public and private organizations. Have both high incomes and high social prestige. Well-educated. Difficult to define a “middle class” (i.e. upper middle, middle middle and lower middle) probably the largest class group in the United States – because being middle class is more that just income, about lifestyles and resources, etc.
Lower Middle Class
Clerical-administrative
Provide support for professionals
Engage in data collection., record-keeping
Paralegals., bank tellers, sales
Blue-collar workers in skilled trades
Working Class
Craft workers
Laborers in factories
Restaurant workers
Nursing home staff
Repair shops, garages
Delivery services
Poor
Working poor – work full-time at wages below poverty line
Social services
Underclass
Social class is one of the most important concepts that sociologists discuss and yet its definition is often illusive. There are two classical sociologists who are most important in the discussions about class .Karl Marx and Max Weber have different views upon social class in contemporary societies. In Karl Marx’s perspective, social class has a two-class system whereas Max Weber argued that social class has three dimensions of stratification: class, status and party And what is frustrating about both is that they did not produce a viable definition of the things that they wrote extensively about.
Karl Marx: 1818-1883
Karl Marx argued there are two major social classes, the ruling class who own the means of production and the subject class, who don’t own the means of production and are a diverse group of people controlled by and working for the ruling class. These two groups are better known as the bourgeoisie and proletariat. In particular, the bourgeoisie use a mode of production, in the form of capitalism, to oppress the proletariat. Whereby the owners of production (bourgeoisie) use the (proletariat) workers labour to produce their surplus value. In turn they pay their workers the smallest amount possible to make a profit, thus exploiting the working class.
The defining factor in what makes them a separate class is the bourgeoisie’s ownership of the means of production, not their wealth, because they don’t produce the surplus value, the proletariat do. The bourgeoisie only appropriate the surplus. In essence the bourgeoisie are a ‘class for itself’ whereas the proletariat are a ‘class in itself’. Marx identifies that the reason we have classes is due to a group sharing a common interest and economic position. The bourgeoisie own the capital of land, machinery and raw materials. Whereas the proletariat own nothing, they can only sell their labour power in an attempt to survive and provide for their families. This in turn results in the social/power relations between the bourgeoisie and proletariat.
Max Weber: 1864 – 1920
While Weber agrees with Marx’s theory of the class distinction between the bourgeoisie and proletariat, he is more interested in the individual’s market value. For Weber, an individual’s class position is determined by their current market value. This market value is established by the individual’s level of education, natural talent, skills and acquired knowledge. With these skills the individual is opened to numerous life chances and opportunities to further their career and increase their standard of living. Their market value equals their economic gain. Market value is defined by their ability to market themselves to a particular job opportunity. For instance, a university degree makes an individual more marketable and as such they have greater chances to work in their preferred field. They are given greater financial rewards and in turn move up the social ladder.
Consequences of social class
Different consumptions of social goods is the most visible consequence of class. In modern societies it manifests as income, inequality, through the subsistence societies it manifested as malnutrition and periodic starvation. The conditions at work vary greatly depending on class. Those in the upper-middle class and middle class enjoy greater freedom in their occupations. They are generally more respected, enjoy more diversity and are able to exhibit some authority. Those in lower classes tend to feel more alienated and have lower work satisfaction overall. The physical conditions of the work place differ greatly between classes. While middle class workers may ” suffer alienating conditions” or ” lack of job satisfaction”, blue-collar workers suffer alienating , often routine, work with obvious physical health hazards, injury and even death.
In the more social sphere, class has direct consequences on lifestyle. Lifestyle includes tastes, preferences, and general style of living. These lifestyles could quite possibly affect education attainment, and therefore status attainment. Class lifestyle also affects how children are raised. For example, a working class person is more likely to raise their child to be a working class and middle class are more likely to be raised in middle- class. This perpetuates the idea of class for future generations.
Since social class is often self-reported, it is difficult to assure the accuracy of the information collected. Even if the data is accurate, social classes are not the same in each region or city. What constitutes upper class in one location may be middle class in another. The lack of consistency involved in researching social class accounts for the difficulty in using it as a reliable variable. Schools and the workplace are greatly influenced by social class.
The look of employment is changing because workers can no longer expect to work their way up through a company. Many companies look outside of the company for people with the right educational background instead of hiring from within. This greatly limits the potential for advancement of workers who lack formal education. For people to move up in the social hierarchy, they must obtain higher education. Instead of spending years at a lower level position, people are spending more time in school and moving directly into management. . Therefore at this day and age, more importance is givin to education in order for one to work his way up the social ladder.

Five Social Classes And Consequence Of Their

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Social Class in to Kill a Mockingbird

Social Class in to Kill a Mockingbird.
There are many different social classes in “To Kill A Mockingbird. ” The factors that separate people into these social classes are their skin color and their occupation. For example, Atticus, Scout, and Jem are part of the highest social class. They are part of this social class because Atticus is a lawyer, which makes him a highly respected person in the community. He is also white, which, at that time was a very important factor that chose who belonged in what social class. Scout and Jem are his children and therefore are also part of this social class. Another person in this same social class is Miss Maudie Atkinson.
She grew up with the Finch’s and is an old friend of theirs. She is now Atticus’s neighbor and is loved by his children. Aunt Alexandra is also part if this because she is known as the “perfect example of what a southern lady should act like. ” She is part of the Finch’s family and is highly respected by the community. One of the very important rules of belonging in this social class is to treat white people with lesser status kindly. It is an unwritten rule that white people with a higher social class than other white people must be hospitable and treat them with respect.
An example of this is when Walter Cunningham is invited by Jem to come over for dinner. When Scout notices Walter using a lot of gravy during dinner she is rude to him and as a result is punished by Calpurnia. The reason for this is because Walter is of a lower class and was invited to eat with Atticus and his family. As a result, it is rude not to let him do and eat what he wants to. An example of a person who is in the next social class is Mrs. DuBose. She is a nasty women and one of the factors that hints that she is not part of the higher social class is the way she talks to her community members.

She is supposed to be kind and respectful to the white people of Maycomb, like Jem. Even though she is nice to Atticus, she talks badly about him behind his back. That is not a quality that a person of a high status would have. Therefore, she isn’t part of that social class. The next social class is the poor, yet respectable white people. The Cunningham’s are in this class because even though they are poor, they manage to live their life by borrowing money and paying back the money borrowed with items from the farm instead of money. Under them are the
Ewell’s, who are poor and disgusting. They are completely rude and so are their children, but they are still in a higher social class than black people since they are white. The next social class is wealthy or middle-class black people. Calpurnia is a part of this class and only is for the reason that she is black. She has all the qualities of a good southern lady, and has perfect manners. She is respected and in good relations with the Finch family. Calpurnia would be in the same social class as Atticus Finch if she weren’t black. Another person who is in this class is Reverend Sykes.
He met Jem and Scout in church and showed how much he respected them and their father for defending the Tom Robinson case. He welcomed them and was very friendly, therefore in the same class as Calpurnia. The last social class is the poor and black people. Lula is in this social class. She is disgraceful to the black people and her motto is that the black people should stick to own community and the white should stay with there’s. She was harsh and shallow to someone who is of her kind (Calpurnia) and she was harsh to two innocent kids just because they are white. There is a very interesting relationship between the white people and black.
The majority of the black people is more mature and has much more class. They accept themselves and their status. They accept how they don’t get credit for all their work. They accept always having the worse of things, like the First Purchase church, which is a very beaten down church. They accept not getting an education with barely any complaints. No matter how much they tolerate, the white people cannot stand them at all and are so afraid of the truth because it means going against a white person’s word. The fact that white people don’t treat white people equally contributes greatly to the way the social classes are separated.

Social Class in to Kill a Mockingbird

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The Great Gatsby and Social Class

The Great Gatsby and Social Class.
There are different types of people in this world: people who do good and people who do evil. Their actions, thoughts, and intentions define them as the type of person they are. Writers such as William Shakespeare and F. Scott Fitzgerald have produced similar work that includes characters who share similar characteristics. Characters such as Daisy from “The Great Gatsby” and Iago from “Othello” contain similar characteristics. Although Daisy and Iago carry different motives, they share identical deceptive schemes which cause similar effects on others.
Both characters through their actions, thoughts, and intentions, are defined as bad people who do evil to manipulate others and take advantage of them. To begin with, the differences between both characters are their motives. Daisy’s motive is wealth and social class. This is evident when Jordan explains how Daisy was deeply in love with a soldier (Gatsby) and that she was caught packing her bag on a winter night to go to New York and say good bye to the soldier. Then she got engaged and married Tom Buchanan, Jordan goes on to explain that Daisy got a string of pearls valued three hundred and fifty thousand dollars.
But the day before the wedding she gets drunk, holding a letter in her hand and says she changes her mind. This shows her true colors; Jordan explains how Daisy is very gay when she knew she was going to marry Tom who is rich. She likes the idea of the wealth and social security she gets from marrying Tom but when she gets drunk her true self comes out and tells Jordan to take back the pearls and tell everyone that she changed her mind. She cries that she changed her mind again and again, also that she does not want to marry Tom anymore.

This shows that deep down she is still in love with Gatsby however, she is more in love with the wealth and social class Tom can provide for her is she marries him. Then, Jordan says that she and her mother’s maid locked the door and got her in a cold bath while she was holding on to the letter. Jordan says that she took it in the tub with her and squeezed it up into a wet ball. The next day at five o’clock she married Tom without as much as a shiver. Jordan does not say whom the letter is from but it is believable it is from Gatsby overseas who wrote the letter to Daisy from overseas and her true emotions came out when she got drunk. Fitzgerald 75, 76). Iago, on the other hand, has a different motive; Iago pursues power unlike Daisy whose motive is wealth and social class. This is shown when Iago plots how to get Cassio’s position in the army and to get revenge on Othello and Cassio, “ ‘Cassio’s a proper man: let me see now; to get his place and to plume up my will in double Knavery. How? How? Let’s see. After some time, to abuse Othello’s ear. That he is too familiar with his wife;” (I. iii. 383-387). Iago is planning for vengeance against Cassio and Othello because Othello promoted Cassio instead of Iago which he is upset about.
It is shown here that Iago’s motive is power and that he turns into a green-eyed monster (III. iii. 168) because he did not get the power he wanted. Therefore, it is evident that the difference between both, Daisy and Iago is their motives. Daisy seeks wealth and social class while Iago on the other hand craves power. Secondly, one of the similarities between both characters is the deceptive schemes. Daisy deceits Gatsby for her own advantage, she uses him and plays with his love for her. This is illustrated when Daisy contradicts herself: “Daisy, that is all over now,” he said earnestly. It doesn’t matter anymore. Just tell him the truth —- that you never loved him—-and it’s all wiped out forever. ” She looked at him blindly. “Why—-how could I love him—-possibly? “You never loved him. ” She hesitated. Her eyes fell on Jordan and me with a sort of appeal, as though she realized at last what she was doing—- and as though she had never, all along, intended doing anything at all. But it was done now. It was too late. “I never loved him,” she said, with perceptible reluctance. […] “Oh you want too much! ” she cried to Gatsby. “I love you now—-isn’t that enough?
I can’t help what’s past. ” She began to sob hopelessly “I did love him once—-but I loved you too. ” […] “I want to speak Daisy alone,” he insisted. “She’s all excited now —–” “Even alone I can’t say I never loved Tom,” she admitted in a pitiful voice. “It wouldn’t be true. ” (132,133). Daisy realizes Gatsby’s obsession with her so she decides to take advantage of him. To make Tom who is cheating on her, jealous. Daisy uses deceptive strategies to make Gatsby believe that she loves him and only him but it is just an act put up by her to make Tom jealous.
When Gatsby asks her to say she never loved Tom she uncomfortably admits but later she changes her mind and tells him he wants too much. She lies to Gatsby and says what he wants to hear at first but then spits out the truth that she does love Tom or at least the perk that Tom comes with. This is an example of Daisy’s deceptive actions causing Gatsby to believe what is not true. Similarly, Iago shares deceptive intentions which cause Othello to believe that Desdemona (his wife) is unfaithful to him.
This is demonstrated by Iago when he feeds Othello lies about Cassio possibly having an affair with Desdemona, “[…] Look to your wife, observe her well with Cassio; Wear your eyes thus: not jealous, nor secure. I would not have you free and noble nature, Out of self-bounty, be abus’d. Look to’t I know our country disposition well” (III. iii. 200-203). Iago creates suspicion in Othello. Othello as gullible as he is creates a greater suspicion in him and forms a green monster in him which is what Iago wanted all along.
Iago feeds Othello a lie which causes Othello to believe what is not true. As a result, it is evident that both Daisy and Iago are prime examples of characters that are similarly deceptive. Lastly, another similarity between both characters is the effect on others from their deceptive actions. Daisy deceptive ways result in three deaths, one of which she committed and one suicide. This is portrayed when Daisy kills Myrtle and Gatsby who is blindly in love with her, willing, takes the blame, “Did you see any trouble on the road? ” he asked after a minute. Yes. ” He hesitated. “Was she killed? ” “Yes” […] “Was Daisy driving? ” “Yes,” he said after a moment, “but of course I’ll say I was. ” (143). Daisy kills Myrtle by hitting her with a car while Gatsby was sitting next to her.
Gatsby loves Daisy greatly enough to take to blame for it which is convenient for Daisy because Myrtle was Tom’s mistress. Daisy kills Tom’s mistress and leaves Gatsby to suffer the consequences. Gatsby’s foolish decision of taking the blame results in his death and a suicide by Mr. Wilson who kills Gatsby. ‘The chauffeur—-he was one of Wolfsheim’s proteges—-heard the shots—-afterward he could only say that he hadn’t thought anything much about them. […] There was a faint, barely perceptible movement of the water the fresh flow from one end urged its way toward the drain at the other. […] It was after we started with Gatsby’s toward the house that the gardener saw Wilson’s body a little way off in the grass, and the holocaust was complete’ ”.
Daisy’s actions results in Gatsby’s death and another death of Mr. Wilson. Mr. Wilson not knowing the truth assumes Gatsby s the murderer of his wife. He kills Gatsby by shooting him when he was in his pool and then commits suicide right after. Likewise, Iago affects others along the same lines. His deceptive actions also result in three deaths, one of which Iago causes and one suicide. Iago’s lies get the best of Othello into turning into a jealous monster to the point where Othello loses control and killed Desdemona. This is demonstrated when Othello locks her in their room, “ ‘Down, strumpet! ’ ‘Kill me tomorrow; let me live tonight! ’ ‘Nay, if you strive—-’ ‘But half an hour! ‘Being done, there is no pause. ’
‘But while I say one prayer! ’ ‘Its too late’ ‘O, Lord, Lord, Lord! ’ *He smothers her*” (V. ii. 80-85). Iago’s evil deceptive deeds successfully fool Othello into believing Desdemona was unfaithful to him when she was not. As a result he kills her by smothering her to death. When Emilia see’s this she tells Othello the truth that Desdemona was faithful and Iago was lying. This causes Iago to stab her so she could speech no more of the truth. (V. ii. 230-235). Othello realizing he was cheated by Iago, runs at Iago to wound him and then stabs himself. V. ii. 350-355). Therefore, it is evident that both characters had similar effects on others. Both effects include 3 deaths, one of which the characters cause and one suicide. Although Daisy and Iago carry different motives they share similar deceptive schemes which cause identical effects on others. Daisy’s motive is wealth and social class but Iago intends to achieve power. However, both characters share similar deceptive plans. Daisy fools and takes advantage of Gatsby to make Tom jealous. Likewise, Iago fools and takes advantage of Othello to make him jealous.
They also affect others similarly; both characters cause three deaths, one caused by themselves and one suicide. Therefore, it is evident that the similarities out weight the differences. The quote that relates to acts of both characters is “I love the world, but humanity is what makes it ugly. ” (Ives, 33). This quote has a very deep meaning to it and is very strong. It describes to the reader that the world will be a better place if humanity tries to make it a better place. The sooner the meaning of peace and love is understood and accepted the sooner the world will be a better place.

The Great Gatsby and Social Class

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