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What Can Parents Do to Protect Children from the Bad Influence of Television Violence?

What Can Parents Do to Protect Children from the Bad Influence of Television Violence?.
Television can be a powerful influence in developing value systems and shaping behavior in the developing children’s mind. Unfortunately, much of today’s television programming has a highly explicit violent content. Numerous studies has been conducted on the effect television violence has on children and adolescence, and all of it shows negative feedbacks. Children tend to develop emotional numbness to all the horror seen on the screen, and gradually accept violence as a norm and a way to solve problems.
Parents can protect their children by engaging them in different after school programs, paying attention to the television their children are watching and try to block some channels showing inappropriate content. One of the most disturbing facts of modern life is the abundance of wasted time spent watching mindless television programs. Children who spend more time in front of the television are more susceptible to all the violence in the media, and not only that they grow to be more aggressive, but also more passive.
One way to avoid that is to involve the kid into different after school activities like arts and crafts programs or outdoor sports. Extracurriculars let the children enjoy themselves in a fun, stress-free environment, get some exercises, and make friends outside of school instead of being trapped at home alone with the only source of entertainment, the TV. It is a proven fact that television and media content are affecting how children and teens perceive the world around them. One way to help ease the negative effect of it is to help them understand what is wrong and what not.

Parents should be aware of what children are watching, and if there is something violent and upset them, it is important to help them through that. Although the violent content, television can offer some very valuable educational programs as well, which could open doors to new fields of knowledge, when viewed responsible and sensibly. That is why parents should not eliminate the television, just get involved into what the child is watching, and explain why violent and the explicit is not worth watching.
Parents can not control what children are doing, or watching every second of the day, that is why many parents rely on some sort of channel blockers. By restricting access to certain channels with violent and explicit language, parents can keep the unwanted content away from the eyes of their children. Childproofing the cable television is one of the best ways to keep the kids away of television violence, but yet it does not guarantee that the kids are protected.
The control of the parents over their viewing time and content is most important of all. Television has become more violent in content in the recent years. Although the media experts are trying to market the explicit content, there are still should be some limits and restriction on what has to be shown on the big screen and what not. Until that happens, parents are the only regulators of that content and as so, they have the right to rule the remote control in their living room.

What Can Parents Do to Protect Children from the Bad Influence of Television Violence?

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Effects Single Parents Families

Effects Single Parents Families.

Research question
What is the impact of being raised in a single parent family on students of the Corinth Secondary School? Rationale I chose to research this topic because it hurts me to see my friends from single parent families fall by the way side. I believe that they fall by the way side because the absent parent is inconsiderate. He (she) never took the time to think of the many difficulties and challenges the single parent would have in raising that child, not only in disciplining, but also by not having sufficient money to feed the child and not being able to provide that child with basic school materials.
To me, it is very disturbing to hear some of the stories from children of my age group who come from single parent families, for instance, having to miss school because his/her parent was not able to provide for hi/her because of a huge financial strain. Time after time, I see some of my friends with their uniforms unkempt and their stomach crying out for food. It does not make me feel any better when I hear and see those things happening around me in society and particularly at my school.

Objectives

This School Based assessment seeks to: Identify the effects on children who are raised in a single parent family.
Identify the effect of single parent families on the academics of children within those households.
Suggest solutions to help teenagers of single parent families cope with the effects of being raised in a single parent family.

Method of investigation In order to collect data for my School Based Assessment, I have decided to use the printed questionnaire because:

The method is inexpensive
The data collected is easy to analyze
The identity of respondents remains confidential

Effects Single Parents Families

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Are parents to stick on their kids?

Are parents to stick on their kids?.
Today I am here to share with you about the loss of my beloved daughter, Juliet. As a father myself, I will be sharing the many mistakes I have made while raising Juliet, hoping you will be able to learn from my past experiences and not make the same mistakes I have already made. One of the biggest mistakes I made as a father is not giving Juliet the freedom she deserved. As parents, we want the best for our children as we want to ensure their safety.
However, we tend to forget that they’re growing up and we take away their hoicks and rights as we think we know what’s best for them. An example of this would be when I threatened Juliet with eviction and portended to disown her if she didn’t marry Paris that I would kick her out and disown her if she didn’t get married to Paris. This was a very unreasonable and harsh decision I made, as I will regret this for the rest of my life as it will lead her to rebel and do things behind my back. If I had Just given her the freedom she deserved, things may not have ended up the way It has.
One of the biggest mistakes I made as a father Is not giving Juliet the freedom she didn’t marry Pans that I would kick her out and disown her if she didn’t get married it has. Didn’t marry Paris that I would kick her out and disown her if she didn’t get married it has. Greetings to all. As you might be familiar already, I am Lord Caplet. Today I am here to share with you about the loss of my beloved daughter, Juliet. As a father myself, I will be sharing the many mistakes I have made while raising Juliet, hoping you will be able to learn from my past experiences and not make the same mistakes I have already made.

Are parents to stick on their kids?

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Should Parents Be Responsible If Their Children Behave Badly?

Should Parents Be Responsible If Their Children Behave Badly?.
Many crimes and social problems are caused by children. Despite the damage these teenage criminals cause, parents are not held responsible in most countries. This essay will discuss whether parents should be forced to pay for their children’s crimes. There are many reasons why parents should not be responsible for crimes committed by teenage children. First of all, teenagers today are independent. They often move out of the parent’s house at 18 years of age or younger. They are expected to learn to take care of themselves and make their own decisions, and not stay like small children attached to their parents.
Secondly, parents are working. They cannot watch their adolescent children all the time. Parents have done their job A third point is that even children from good families can sometimes commit crimes. Parents should not be responsible if they have worked hard to raise their children properly. However, because of the many problems young troublemakers cause, I feel we should make parents responsible. Firstly, most juvenile crimes are committed by adolescents whose parents do not care or make any effort to control their children. If parents had to pay fines, they might make more effort.
Another point is that even though the children may seem mature, they are not really able to make good decisions. Parents should be responsible for raising and teaching their children until they are fully grown. Furthermore, if children know that their parents will have to pay, they will think carefully before doing getting into trouble In summary, there are good reasons both for and against making parents pay for acts committed by their children. However, I feel strongly that if we want to reduce the number of such crimes, we need to make parents take more responsibility.

Should Parents Be Responsible If Their Children Behave Badly?

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Should Divorced Parents Remarry?

Should Divorced Parents Remarry?.
OUTLINE I. Introduction Thesis statement: divorced parents should not remarry for the following reasons. II. Body A. Divorced parents remarry which will have negative impacts on their children 1. Children will be placed in a complex situation. 2. Parents’ remarriage will give children pernicious influences on their behavior and study. B. Divorced parents will face complex relationships when they remarry 1. Stepparents will get into troubles with stepchildren. 2. Stepparents have to face unresolved issues related to the first marriage. C.
Counterargument and refutation. 1. Counterargument. a. Children might have a perfect family with both mother and father which help them mature. b. New spouses in stepfamilies may have strong and harmonious marital relationship. 2. Refutation. a. Remarriage has negative effects on children. b. There are many conflicts happening in stepfamily. III. Conclusion Because of the above reasons, it is better for divorced parents not to remarry. Should divorced parents remarry? Remarriage of divorced parents is always a controversial issue in our modern society.
Some of divorced parents choose remarriage as another chance or hope with a new family while many others decide to become a single parent. As making the decision to remarry, divorced parents have to choose a new partner who is suitable not only for them but for their children as well. Havemann and Lehtinen (1990) quoted a sociologist, ‘the difficulty which remarried family must wrestle may be tremendous’ (p. 280). Divorced parents can get into big troubles which people in first marriages will never foresee.

In our opinion, divorced parent should not remarry for some rationales. Firstly, divorced parent remarriage is mainly responsible for children’s stress, depression, severe behaviors and bad schoolwork. Children not only can be the unwitting victim of a network of jealous and angry people but also suffer from conflict of loyalty. A study cited by Lutz (as cited in Strong, Devault & Sayad, 1998) showed that many children felt stressful and worried because they were put in difficult predicaments. For example, a teenage girl felt heavily stressed.
Although she lived with her mother and stepfather, she had to spend her weekends with her maternal grandparents and her paternal grandparents. She was always asked to report what happened at the other place and guard secret about it (R. H. Lauer & J. C. Lauer, 2007). Moreover, Visher and Visher (as cited in Devault et al. , 1998) see that many children in the stepfamilies who suffer the conflict of loyalties and loss of love from their parents can be in a state of great anxiety, confusion and they could behave unpredictably.
In addition, according to Wallerstein and Kelly (as cited in Schwartz & Scott, 1994), remarriages of divorced parents not only cause children’s tension but also affect their study. The boys, for instance, had negative attitudes and did not concentrate on study in school because their father and stepmother refused to send their biological mother money (Havemann & Letinen, 1990). Secondly, remarried parents will face stepchildren’s disputation and unresolved issues related to the first marriage.
Children at any age tend to oppose and begrudge their stepparent, a newcomer in their family (Lauer & Lauer, 2007). In fact, they usually show their distrust, suspect, and resentment toward their stepparent. Even when stepmother try her best to be closed to stepchildren and satisfy their needs, the stepchildren still do not accept her as their real mother since they think that she is trying to replace their biological mother (DeVault, Sayad & Strong, 1998). By any cost, children try to “drive a stepparent out of the home” (Havemann & Lehtinen, 1990, p. 82). As a result, remarriages indeed have been devastated and disrupted by teenage stepchildren (Havemann & Lehtinen, 1990). Besides, not only stepchildren but also ex-spouses can be a complicated problem with remarried couples. Especially, former marital habits have a negative impact on the rapport between new spouses (Schwartz & Scott, 1994). A woman in her 30s, for example, told some troubles about her remarriage. Her husband bought her a nice nightgown, however he had a ritual of buying small size which fit his ex-wife but it did not fit her.
Similarly, she also had a mistake that she called her current husband by her ex-partner’s name (Havemann & Letinen, 1990). In addition, keeping in touch with ex-spouses is inevitable. For instance, Sager and his associates reported that Mrs. Prince was annoyed because her husband has some calls continuously with his ex-wife many times a day for problems involving his biological children (Lauer & Lauer, 2007). Opposing people may claim that divorced parent remarriages may help the children to recover from emotional trauma of their parent’s divorce.
Furthermore, on account of becoming older and more experienced than in the first marriages, new spouses in stepfamilies might have strong and harmonious marital relationship. However, as stated previously, parent remarriages put the children in a problematic position and cause their emotional troubles. For stepdaughters, both Hetherington and Joshua Fischman (as cited in Schwartz & Scott, 1994) found that they experience more depression and have more negative behaviors.
Besides, there are many conflicts happening in a stepfamily, which affects new spouses’ harmony like stepchildren’s disagreement and relationships with ex-spouses. Children’s behaviors have negative effects on the marital rapport, namely they act against stepparents and make a resentful atmosphere (Schwartz & Scott, 1994). Furthermore, stepsibling relationship is also one of the biggest problems in stepfamily because it can lead to stepsibling rivalry (Schwartz & Scott, 1994).
As a result of such disharmony, “it is often difficult for remarried family to feel like a real family” (Schwartz & Scott, 1994, p. 389). In conclusion, complicated problems with stepchildren and ex-spouse and negative impacts on children are two most severe issues in remarriage. Both the quality of the marital relationship and the stability in remarriage are poor. The statistics indicate that divorce people who remarry have a higher divorce rate than those in first marriages (Schwartz & Scott, 1994).
Therefore, to our view, it is better for divorced parents not to remarry, which benefits both them and their children. Words: 852 * References DeVault, C. , Sayad, B. W. , & Strong, B. (1998). The marriage and family experience (7th ed. ). Belmont, Wadsworth publishing company. Havemann, E. & Lehtinen, M. (1990). Marriages and families (2nd ed. ). Englewood cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. Lauer, R. H. & Lauer, J. C. (2007). Marriage & family (6th ed. ). New York: Phillip A. Butcher. Schwartz, M. A. & Scott, B. M. (1994). Marriages & families. Englewood cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Should Divorced Parents Remarry?

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The Effect of Divorced Parents to their Children

The Effect of Divorced Parents to their Children.
The research must be qualified as representing average differences and do not necessarily indicate that all children in divorced families are worse off than all children in intact families. Since there is so much discussion of the effects of divorce on school performance, I want to begin by addressing whether there are really any differences between children who live in divorced families and children who live in married two-parent families (intact). The preponderance of the evidence appears to indicate that divorce does have negative effects on children”s adaptation and academic development. Furthermore, the specific effects differ from family to family.
The argument that divorce has effects on the ability of a child”s academic performance finds support in the case-control study of Children of Divorce: Academic Outcome (Roizblatt et al, 1997). This study focuses on identifying the specific responses that are susceptible for the low academic outcomes, associated with different levels of hostility, aggression, anxiety, and depression that can last until adulthood. To build upon the hypotheses, the authors then examined whether subsequent disadvantages are measured in all aspects of education, from grade points averages to standardized tests to exams/diplomas and years of completed education.
The study was conducted at eight public schools in Santiago, Chile. A total of 446 children were examined where almost half the pupils were found to be of divorced families. The students” results were based on the variables of age, sex, and average marks. In order to provide a means of comparison for the experimental group, the authors had the control group (parents living together) choose names that are on the class list that fulfilled the requirement. The data was analyzed in averages, percentages, estimated odds ratio, and confidence levels.

The results indicate that children of divorced parents were on average 20% more likely to fail a course than a child of a controlled group. The average marks were also 20% lower for the non-intact children. However, the attendance was almost identical with both being 95 %. In this study, it is obvious that divorce has an impact on a child”s academic performance.
The relationship between intact and divorced children is further investigated in a study (Forehand et al, 1997) of the Cumulative Risks Across Family Stressors: Short and Long Term Effects for Adolescents. Furthermore, it discusses claims made that children from divorced families had their grade point averages, academic achievements, and standardized intelligence test scores decreased during and after the psychosocial adjustment.
The study took place in two assessments, early adolescence and early adulthood. The study recruited for participation through local newspaper advertisements and fliers distributed to schools and posted throughout the local community. Additionally, some divorced families were identified through examination of courthouse records and subsequently contacted by mail or telephone. The families were paid $50 for their participation. Approximately six years after the first assessment, follow up research was conducted in which adults filled out questionnaires.
In order to avoid common-method variance, individuals were assessed by independent sources: adolescent self-report, teacher report, and school records. Letter grades were obtained from math, English, science, and social studies and were assigned numeric values. In the young adult phase, level of education was also taken into consideration. Several risk factors were included to make the results more valid and consistent.
The results of the analysis was shown and expressed through a Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI). It showed a significant decrease in level of education completed, grade point averages, and achievement tests for both the adolescents and young adults. The researchers feel that parents” being less available to assist and monitor the children and the conflicts between the parents heavily affects the child and his future. Whereas the article exhibited some weaknesses, it also contained strengths. For example, although only Caucasian people were used, the results did include data from more than one period (adolescence and young adulthood.) The evidence was correct with the authors” prediction, indicating almost exactly what Forehand, Biggar, and Kotchick previously hypothesized.
Further evidence that children of divorce do worse academically can be seen in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1997). This survey proved that a divorce during a child”s life affects his or her academic abilities during early schools years and throughout college.
The previous studies provided answers in the controversy over academic standards of children of divorce. However, there is more to the relationship between a child and the academic abilities possessed. Another method of investigating the relationship focuses on the effects of remarriage following divorce on the academic achievement of children. Although there exists considerable consensus among family theorists regarding the negative effects of divorce upon children both psychologically and in terms of academic achievement, the same consensus does not exist regarding the effects of remarriage. However, social scientists have recently accumulated a sizable amount of evidence indicating that remarriage has ill effects on many children.
The journal (Jeyenes et al, 1999), The Effects of Remarriage Following Divorce on the Academic Achievements of Children examines the assumption by educators that parental remarriage benefits children academically. Most educational researchers and theorists have given almost no exhortations to the needs of children of divorce from reconstituted families. The primary reason has been that researchers and Americans, as a whole, believe that parental remarriage generally benefited children. The study included students from the 1988, 1990 and 1992 National Longitudinal Survey data sets that matched students by family structure, race, and socioeconomic status. The project was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education”s National Center for Statistics and designed by the National Opinion Research Center.
The research included 24,599 students from 1052 schools. Questionnaires were given out to the parents, teachers, and students. Furthermore, achievement tests in math, reading, science, and social studies were administered to students. These tests were curriculum based cognitive tests used in overlapping methods to measure academic achievements.
For all the standardized tests, the mean scores for children from divorced, reconstituted families were less than for both children of divorce from single-parent families and children from intact families. When matched for race and socioeconomic status, the differences were not statistically significant. Children living in a divorced, reconstituted family had negative results compared with an intact family. This fact was shown in all four-test measures: lower in math, science, and social studies, but the smallest effect was in the reading test. Contrary to popular misconception, the children of reconstituted families scored lower in all aspects of the tests than children of divorce from single-parent families.
These findings do not support the assumption held by many educators that children of divorce from reconstituted homes are better off than divorced and intact children. Actually, the results support the idea that children of divorce from reconstituted families are at an academic disadvantage versus their counterparts in intact families, and are no better off academically than children of divorce from single-parent families.
To solidify the results of this research another journal similarly argues that the reconstitution of a family shows lower educational attainments. This is the (Jonsson et al, 1997) Journal of Family Dissolution, Family Reconstitution, and Children”s Education. The study is done both longitudinally and cross-sectionally on large and recent Swedish data. It demonstrates that compared to children in intact families, children who have experienced family reconstitution show lower academic and educational attainment.
The journal examines the association between family structure and children”s educational attainment, measured as early school leaving and transition to upper secondary school. The research is done in Sweden, which is a society characterized by a generous and predominantly universal social policy. The respondents started school at age seven and passed through the comprehensive Swedish school system consisting of nine compulsory grades. The data consists of 120,000 cases that were studied for every aspect of a person”s education. The Swedish Commission collected the information on Educational Inequality.
First, the researchers found that children of remarried parents continued at school after the compulsory years less often than did those from other family types. For example, they had an 8% more chance of leaving school and 20% less change of going on to college. These problems are due to both poorer performances in school as measured by lower grade point averages, as well as educational decisions on study programs. Both analyses demonstrated that Swedish children who have experienced family reconstitution show decreased academic proficiencies. The cross-sectional analysis shows that children”s attainment is markedly lower in reconstituted families consisting of two non-married parents than in single parent families. The study consistently reveals educational disadvantages for children from separated and remarried families, as measured by standardized tests, exams/diplomas, grade point average, and years of completed education.
The analysis of the four aforementioned studies reveals much about the effects of divorce and remarriage on a child”s education. It is obvious that children react to a major change in their lives with a plethora of powerful emotions. In both the Roizblatt and Forehand articles, divorce was shown to have a negative impact on grades and test scores throughout a child”s career. However, there are numerous reasons explaining these effects including conflicts, stress, economic losses, and adjustments. In both the Jonsson and Jeynes articles, conclusions stated that remarriage adversely affects a child”s education. However, reconstitution of a family may also have its advantages. Again, the child is faced with problems like not trying or not getting along with the new member of the family. Results show that the majority

The Effect of Divorced Parents to their Children

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‘The Minnow Catching Boys’ and ‘My Parents Kept Me from Children who were Rough’

‘The Minnow Catching Boys’ and ‘My Parents Kept Me from Children who were Rough’.
Comparing and Contrasting the children in Susan Skinner’s ‘The Minnow Catching Boys’ and ‘My Parents Kept Me from Children who were Rough’ by Stephen Spender. In this essay I am going to discuss ‘The Minnow Catching Boys’ by Susan Skinner and ‘My Parents kept me from Children who were Rough’ by Stephen Spender. I will focus on the similarities and differences between the children in the poems in terms of their actions, the language used to describe them and their impact on the reader. The Minnow Catching Boys’ is a poem about a group of boys who very skillful and adventurous. ‘My Parents kept me from children who were rough’ is also about a group of boy bullies who really torture others a lot and play rough. The children in ‘The Minnow Catching Boys’ are described as skillful and the outdoor-type boys. This poem is based on a Victorian/older lifetime according to its facts; Boys nowadays play video games and are interested in technology or sports. This also refers to the quote “the sun burnt boys’ which means that sunscreen was not invented.
I would imagine them as scruffy boys wearing a shirt with a waistcoat and knee breeches (knee length shorts from older times); all dull colours and by looking back it says ‘Breeches rolled’. The children are in a focused, competitive mood, as said in the poem, ‘Scan and dip’ as well as ‘they make bets poke and tip, their nimble catch’. ‘For they have always been here the minnow catching boys. ’ makes me think that this competitive hobby has been passed down from many generations. ‘…….. And when they have had enough, the minnow catching boys make their way home’ makes me think these boys are very carefree.
I thought quotes like ‘………. And a small girl who can never quite catch up calls for them to wait, but no one waits’ give me a feeling that these boys are mean and cruel or maybe just in a rush. The quote ‘ The dog shakes off in a cascade of diamonds’ is one of the most striking pieces of imagery for me because it imaginatively describe thousands of sparkling water droplets as a ‘cascade of diamonds’. The tone which this poem would be read in would be slow and suspending- long pauses. You would read this poem in this tone so you can get your audience right ‘into’ the scene-as the boys are focused and concentrating too hard.

The children in ‘My Parents kept me from Children who were rough’ are described as mean, arrogant and a fierce group of bullies. I imagine them as very scruffy boys with their clothes torn; as they don’t care. I think they would be wearing the same clothes as the boys in the other poem but in an ill-suited manner. I think this poem is also set in the same time as the other poem- older times/Victorian times. This poem quotes ‘They threw words like stones’ which makes me think that these boys are rude, ill-mannered and that their insults really ‘hurt’ people- using words like weapons.
These boys were also involved in physical abuses to others, which refers to the quote’ Their knees tight on my arms’. ‘They were lithe’, this quote makes me think these boys are super-fit, strong, flexible and very versatile. I think these boys look like are big headed and want to be threatening to people. Their parents might not able to control them or maybe are not even aware of their actions. ‘Muscles like iron ‘says that these boys are unbeatable and formidably strong. I would like to read this poem in a fast, envious tone, because I think that the narrator is envying these strong and super-fit boys.

‘The Minnow Catching Boys’ and ‘My Parents Kept Me from Children who were Rough’

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Early Childhood And Why Parents Choose Certain Schools

Early Childhood And Why Parents Choose Certain Schools.

I merely want my kid to hold merriment! is a remark I hear on a regular basis from parents touring my preschool. But the thaumaturgy of merriment someway disappears as kids reach the age of three or four, and when they start to fix for “ existent school. ” Standards, standardised trials, awards, classs etc. , shortly become parents ‘ greatest concerns. Somewhere along the line, the fun remark is replaced with inquiries refering to kindergarten preparedness and petitions for worksheets, prep and some kind of “ class ” .
As a preschool owner/educator, I remember so vividly the twenty-four hours I decided to go forth an unbelievable 13-year calling as a public school instructor in one of Ohio ‘s wealthiest school territories to have and run my ain preschool. This was non an easy determination, because I love learning ; go forthing the schoolroom was one of the hardest professional determinations I have of all time made. However, the criterions and standardised testing that were ordering our course of study patterns were in complete struggle with my beliefs. Fortunately, I had options and decided to remain in instruction by traveling to younger ages, which at the clip, seemed exempt from the open force per unit area of standardised testing. I envisioned a installation that embraced drama as the primary acquisition doctrine – 1 that valued child involvements and focal point groups, one that integrated multicultural aspects.
I could non be more pleased with my determination to walk off from an astonishing retirement, nice wage, and summers off with my ain kids to offer my ideals to other immature scholars. Small did I realize that the same incubuss that plagued me antecedently would go on to stalk me at my preschool. Although research on drama and cognitive development provide a batch of support for the play-based course of study for our immature kids, the recent province and national accent on proficiency trial public presentation has reinforced the construct of minimum drama clip, even in the primary scene. Many preschools and simple schools have reduced or even eliminated drama from their agendas ( Bodrova & A ; Leong, 2003 ; Brandon, 2002 ; Johnson, 1998 ; Murline, 2000 ; Vail 2003 ) . Play, even the little sections, are being replaced with academic preparedness patterns, peculiarly literacy and reading to fit the content of standardised testing ( Brandon, 2002 ; Fromberg, 1990 ; Johnson, 1998 ; Steinhauer, 2005 ; Vail, 2003 ) .

The changeless battle for answerability, every bit good as “ top-down criterions and coercive force per unit area to raise tonss on an eternal series of standardised trial ” – ( Kohn, 2004, p.572 ) , in add-on to the conflict of bettering instruction, all seem to be ordering current educational tendencies. Even if a plan embraces the importance of drama, the outer forces that continue to press for faculty members is invariably endangering the foundation from which our immature kids build their educational hereafter. “ We strip them of their best innate assurance in directing their ain acquisition, travel rapidly them along, and frequently wear them out. ” ( Almon, 2003, p.20 ) . This push for a more academic foundation in the early old ages may happen us losing sight of the existent intent of larning. If we continue down this way of making a test-prep course of study in which our accent is on how the kid scores on a reading trial instead than on leting kids to read for pleasance and information after go forthing school, we might bring forth rather the opposite consequence and negatively impact cognitive development.
However, the planetary challenge that the Information Age has imposed on us has similarly prompted instruction functionaries to redefine school accomplishment. The authorities ‘s move to set up educational criterions through the ( No Child Left Behind Act ) NCLB was based on the diminution of instruction criterions since the start of the 70s ( Peterson, 2003 ) . At present, most schools implement standard-based course of study, formal rating methods, and numerical scaling system in response to the call for a wider educational transmutation. Suffice to advert, the U.S. ranks merely 19th in the Literacy Index established by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization ( UNESCO ) ( 2007 ) . Such informations support the current tendency in instruction, and connote the demand of preschool pedagogues to react consequently. In this consideration, it is worthwhile to weigh what we know about the significance of play-based course of study as it contradicts with what functionaries in Higher Education promote, the standard-based course of study. With the aid of parents who themselves have witnessed the relevancy of play-based course of study to the current instruction system and to the broader facets of their kids ‘s lives, this survey shall derive fresh findings on how parents understand the play-based course of study. Knowing how parents understand play-based course of study is of import, it will supply insight into what information parents draw upon in doing early educational determinations for their kids. .
Since parents are the 1s who decide where to inscribe their kids, it would be best to larn how they feel towards play-based course of study. To procure a intelligent research determination, during this survey I will concentrate on interviews, observations and documents/documentation, with parents whose kids are presently enrolled in a play-based course of study. I plan to interview five parents ; carry oning three interviews: a Life History interview, a Current Context interview that includes a sum-up of their present state of affairs, and a Follow up interview. In add-on to the three interviews, observations will be conducted and artefacts will be collected to heighten the informations aggregation.
I presently own and operate a preschool situated in a Northeastern Ohio suburb. The demographics environing my school consist of upper in-between category, educated, two-parent families. In the recent yesteryear, we were runing with 248 Caucasic households but have noticed a cultural tendency altering our school ‘s population: we now house six native Asiatic households, eight native Indian households, three Afro-american households, and two biracial households out of a sum of 257 households. This tendency, I believe, is due to a new 30-acre infirmary installation opening across the street. This survey will take topographic point in a similar preschool. The commercial trade name preschool ( anonym ) has similar demographics and utilizes a play-based course of study.
As I tour households, I am ever assured that parents want the best for their kids. The determination to go forth a immature kid to a non-family member is hard but common, and it is what brought me to this point in my life: a 43 year-old female parent of two girls, ages 10 and 13, prosecuting a PhD in Curriculum and Instruction with an early childhood focal point.
A really attractive, well-groomed adult female in her thirtiess, entered my school anteroom keeping an expensive pocketbook, and armed with a list of inquiries, began her pursuit for the perfect child care supplier. This well-spoken ma has a two-year-old boy and an infant girl. She, an lawyer and her hubby, a occupant physician, merely moved to our community from Washington, DC. My tour involves a short debut of myself and my background, every bit good as the school ‘s. I ever include a short description of our doctrine, which includes drama, a circuit of the installation, an debut to all instructors, and, eventually, a meeting in my office where we address all inquiries on their list. Such a list typically includes: safety and security, ratios, ill policy, subject policy, sanitation processs, tiffin and bite, tuition, etc. In this case, course of study was ne’er mentioned, even after I spoke of our play-based doctrine, our Flex Learning Program, etc. Such things did non look of import to this ma. She asked about instructor turnover, how many babies were presently enrolled, how many instructors were in the schoolroom, and if her babe would be rocked to kip. She asked if her immature yearling would see the gym, which is located in the older edifice ; if he would travel outside every twenty-four hours ; and if he could take part in karate and association football. Literature back uping everything discussed during the circuit, including course of study issues, was handed to her, every bit good as a concern card with the web reference for any extra information.
This is really much a typical circuit. The female parent called subsequently to denote that her determination was complete and her kids would be get downing the following Monday. That was two old ages ago. Her kids still attend my school full clip, now ages three and five. Both childs are in the West installation that houses older kids: older Preschool, Pre K, Jr-K, K, and after school classrooms/program. Her kids are booming academically and socially. Yet, two old ages subsequently, her concern shifted to academic preparedness. She made an assignment with me to reexamine the Ohio Pre K criterions which she received from her neighbour. Our hour-and-half hr meeting consisted of illustrations of merely how these criterions are being implemented, met, and mastered without the usage of paper/pencil, bore, skill worksheets, and appraisal tools. Although our doctrine has non changed, nor has her desire for her kids to hold merriment, the fright of success in school has crept into this ma ‘s thought. Walking through her boy ‘s and girl ‘s schoolrooms daily and detecting childs edifice blocks, making dramatic drama, utilizing sand and H2O, and working at art Stationss, reassures her that the childs are so holding merriment, but what are they larning? How can she be certain they will be prepared for “ school? ”
This has me presenting several opposing inquiries. What are parents ‘ beliefs
and attitudes towards an early childhood play-based course of study, and has their beliefs and attitudes changed since come ining the play-based plan? What grounds can I offer parents that play-based course of study is an appropriate course of study for primary school preparedness? How do I recommend for kindergartners as a clip in life to care for drama as a footing for holistic development and acquisition?
It is my desire, as a strong advocator of drama for little kids, to better understand where parents are coming from, how they are informed, and what they draw upon to do their concluding decisions. Therefore, in my survey, I will ask from parents their beliefs and attitude about play-based course of study in the hope of better apprehension where parents are coming from. This information will better inform instructors in their parent instruction patterns every bit good as parents in their hunt for a preschool.
Approximately Early on Childhood Education Programs
Early on childhood instruction plans provide foundational acquisition experiences to really immature kids in readying for formal schooling. Early childhood instruction plans strive to supply kids with the basic accomplishments in literacy and numeracy, which are important for all degrees of instruction, while, at the same clip, supplying the societal, emotional, and cultural interaction that kids need for adulthood and societal development. There is a broad fluctuation in kid attention plans in the United States runing from basic care-based, and sometimes merely custodial-based attention to nationally accredited early childhood plans such as those promoted by the National Association for the Education of Young Children ( NAEYC ) . A figure of early childhood instruction theoretical accounts are in topographic point: Montessori, Reggio-Emilia, Waldorf, Play-Based, and Academics-Based, each holding a different doctrine and educational aim, but all nisus to lend to the preparedness of kids for formal direction ( Singer, Singer, Plaskon, & A ; Schweder, 2003 ) .
Theoretical Models
Earlier theories on kid development do non straight stipulate drama as an indispensable facet of cognitive development yet constructivist theories recognize it as an of import factor impacting kids ‘s involvement and societal development. In add-on, neuroscience contributes to the position that physical and age-related drama enhances encephalon, physical, and overall development ( Frost 1998 ) .
The societal constructivist theory is the force that determines this survey. It claims that persons ‘ perceptual experiences of the “ world ” around them shape their ideas and behaviour ( Berger & A ; Luckman, 1966 ) and that the building of significance is a procedure “ forged in the melting pot of mundane interactionaˆ¦meanings are negotiated, exchanged, and modified through mundane interactions with others ” ( Rosenholtz, 1989, p. 3 ) . It besides says that people construct their ain apprehension and cognition of the universe through sing and reflecting upon those experiences.
Constructivism posits that kids develop their ain constructs of things based on anterior cognition and experience. Guided by people, anterior cognition or experience, they perceive, analyze, and finally do up their ain thoughts sing the universe. Therefore, anterior accomplishments used at drama may be applied relevantly to other state of affairss, such as job resolution, analysis, or decision-making. This makes play an of import portion of kids ‘s life, as it serves as the debut to higher accomplishments and more hard challenges of life.
In peculiar, Lev Vygotsky ( cited in Palmer, 2004 ) , a well-known constructivist supports the importance of drama in the kid ‘s development. In his last talk, “ Play and the Psychological Development of the Child, Vygotsky emphasized the importance of drama during the kid ‘s early old ages. Harmonizing to him, drama is portion of a kid ‘s Zone of Proximal Development ( ZPD ) . ZPD is the difference between what a kid can make and what s/he can non. During drama, the kid behaves beyond his age, and discovers new ways of making things such as different forms and highs of blocks. As the kid does this, s/he explores the deepnesss of ZPD, which consequences to a better acquisition ability.
In the same manner, neuroscience provides support for kid ‘s drama. Frost ( 1998 ) paperss that encephalon development is farther improved as kids engage in age-appropriate drama. Conversely, he illustrates that want of drama could ensue in “ deviant behaviour ” ( 8 ) . It can be gathered that in Vgotsky ‘s societal constructivist theory, parents form an apprehension when it comes to placing the “ fit ” academic environment for their kid based on their outlooks
Research Methodology Focus and Questions
Based on the ends of this survey, the employment of methodological analysis through the acquisition of narrative enquiry and the instance survey design are appropriate. Narrative instance survey will be used for this research undertaking as it will let me, the research worker, to witness and describe a descriptive scene in order to portion experiences
Case Study
This survey adopts the instance survey design with the position that single instances provide more in-depth information. Case surveies focus on the person, his/her experiences, and immediate world, which is needed to deduce significance and apprehension of the issue or concept under scrutiny. Furthermore, it provides existent illustrations from existent people who are unencumbered by the usage of preset steps or studies, and whose responses will merely ensue in Numberss and statistics ( Bogdan & A ; Biklen, 2007 ) . In this survey, persons, the parents ( either female parent or male parent in one household ) should hold a kid or kids who are enrolled in a school that implements play-based course of study. These persons will be interviewed and asked to portion their narratives based on open-ended inquiries that correspond to the over-arching research inquiries. In making so, the persons ‘ experiences and beliefs will be discussed in order to get at a better apprehension of the research subject, which regards parents beliefs and attitudes of a play-based course of study. It is expected that other factors such as race, faith, and socioeconomic position would act upon the experiences and ideas of parents. Therefore, the parents selected for the survey will come from different backgrounds. In add-on to the three planned interviews, observations including parent/ instructor conferences, PTO meetings, assorted parent jubilations such as “ A Day in the Life of PreSchooler ” , “ Muffins With Mom ” , “ ( Root ) Beer and Pretzels with Dad ” , Parents Night Out, Parents ‘ Information Evening etc will be observed. Artifacts such as Parent Handbook, School ‘s literature including the school ‘s mission statement, pupil rights, pupil portfolio information will be submitted to supplement
Narrative Inquiry
For the intent of this survey I will besides be pulling on narrative enquiry ( Clandinin & A ; Connelly, 2000 ) to look into five parents beliefs and attitudes towards a drama -based early childhood course of study within a in private owned early childhood installation. Coming from the societal constructivist position, I believe that experiences are important. Clandinin & A ; Connelly besides suggest experience is important in their three dimensional model for analyzing how the participants past, present and future contexts act upon their beliefs and attitudes towards a drama -based early childhood course of study. Concentrating on narrative enquiry will assist me to underdtand how parents beliefs and attitudes towards a play-based early childhood course of study have been established. This alone attack is attractive because it provides the chance for the parents ‘ voices to be heard. In understanding their beliefs and attitudes of a play-based early childhood course of study, narrative enquiry will let me to research how their beliefs and attitudes affect their decsion to inscribe or non in enroll in a installation that promotes a play-based curriuculum and how these beliefs and attitudes have evolved, through the narratives that they portion.
This survey will utilize the narrative in-depth interview as a qualitative information aggregation method, which can arouse far richer information than a study. Further, interviews offer the research worker a means to clear up responses and validate participant responses. Cohen et Al. ( 2000 ) posited that single behaviours can merely be understood by understanding persons ‘ readings of the universe around them. Therefore, meaningful societal action demands to be interpreted from the point of position of the histrions or the people who are in that peculiar state of affairs. It can be said that parents who have already enrolled their kid in a play-based preschool would of course experience more strongly about it than parents who have non sent their kid to a play-based preschool ( Bryman, 2004 ) .
This qualitative instance survey will analyze preschool parents ‘ beliefs and attitudes utilizing a narrative enquiry data-collection scheme in order to showcase the experiences and perceptual experiences of parents towards play-based course of study in early childhood plans. Case survey and narrative enquiry seek to understand the peculiar inside informations in a historically and socially bounded context ( Clandinin & A ; Connelly, 2000 ) .
Main Research Questions
The chief research inquiry for this survey is “ what are parents beliefs and attitudes towards an early childhood play-based course of study? ”
Supporting Research Questions
I have identified several back uping research inquiries to reflect upon throughout Clandinin and Connelly ( 2000 ) 3-dimensional interviewing procedure. In looking forward/backward I am interested in understanding how persons ‘ life histories inform their current beliefs and attitudes towards play-based course of studies. In looking inward/outward I am interested in understanding what outside factors influence their current beliefs and attitudes towards play-based curriculums..
What are their beliefs on drama?
What are parents ‘ beliefs sing developmentally appropriate patterns?
What are parents ‘ perceptual experiences of early acquisition?
What grounds can I offer parents that play-based course of study is an appropriate course of study for primary school preparedness?
How do I recommend for kindergartners as a clip in life to care for drama as a footing for holistic development and acquisition?
. Childs have different demands and the preschool plan should be able to turn to those demands. From my experience, I have found that parents frequently choose preschools that are child-friendly ; that is, they have passed safety criterions, provide plenty learning stuffs, employ qualified and caring instructors, and maintain an attractive installation. Rarely do parents inquire about the school ‘s course of study or its academic offerings. In my experience, parents expect preschools to learn kids rudimentss like forms, colourss, alphabet, Numberss, and reading. Most preschools integrate these basic accomplishments into their acquisition plans, but each preschool differs in how the said accomplishments are presented to the kids for learning intents.
Researching parents ‘ beliefs and attitudes would assist place the relevancy of play-based course of study, whether it has helped ease their kids ‘s preparedness and ability to larn and develop accomplishments needed for the “ existent school ” or for mundane life. Furthermore, their responses will function as valuable penetrations to pedagogues in general, including those who are non implementing drama.
Sing its focal point, play-based course of study may be mostly misperceived as non supplying adequate attending to accomplishments and acquisition. Besides, the current standard-based instruction being implemented, may see drama unimportant, therefore curtail clip for it or wholly disregard it. Such would be deterrent to kids whose basic needs include drama and merriment. In this position, the inquiries that I would wish to elaborate on include: What are parents ‘ beliefs and attitudes towards play-based course of study? What factors led to the development of these beliefs and attitudes? How do/did play-based course of study affect their kids ‘s acquisition and development? and How do parents ‘ beliefs and attitudes sing drama impact the execution of play-based course of study and standard-based curriculum/formal direction?
Purpose of the Study
I believe it is of import for all parents to hold a thorough apprehension of the course of study that their kid will be sing, whether in preschool or in any other educational scene. Preschools enjoy a certain sum of flexibleness in how they teach immature kids. Different learning theoretical accounts are available, and some schools integrate two theoretical accounts ( i.e, Montessori and Reggio Emilia ) . When parents know and understand the course of study of their kid ‘s preschool, they are more likely to go involved in the school ‘s activities. They so cognize how to reenforce their kid ‘s acquisition at place, and tend to join forces more with instructors ( Sission, 2009 ) .
My quest to understand the beliefs and attitudes of five parents towards a play-based course of study has multiple intents. First, is to supply readers and the early childhood instruction sector with information refering parental beliefs and attitudes towards play-based course of study ; 2nd, to larn how, harmonizing to parents ‘ positions has play-based course of study affected their kids ‘s acquisition and development ; and 3rd, to spot whether they believe it serves as an effectual tool for early childhood instruction.
Statement of the Problem
Early on childhood research workers have reported that immature kids learn best through activities that support the development of the whole kid ( Elkind 2001 ) . David Elkind ( 2001 ) , in a piece reminiscent of Piaget ‘s constructivist positions, entitled “ Young Einstein: Much Too Early, ” argued that immature kids learn best through direct interaction with their environment. Before a certain age, they merely are non capable of the degree of concluding necessary for formal direction. However, national concern with answerability, competition, proving and “ back-to-basics, ” puts an over-emphasis on faculty members and single-subject instruction ( Elkind, 2007 ; Ornstein, 2002 ; Perrone, 2000 ) . In response to these concerns, early childhood plans may concentrate the course of study on the instruction of academic accomplishments ( Morrison, 2004 ) . These factors have led to narrowly-defined course of study, which deny immature kids valuable life experiences found in drama. Although a turning concern on math and linguistic communication ability in the higher twelvemonth degrees has prompted the execution of standard-based course of study, it is non plenty to enforce such sort of system in the preschool degree. In the first topographic point, kids are a batch different from grownups in their ways to larn. Unlike grownups, kids, particularly little 1s, need drama ( Ginsburg, 2007 ) ; they need to be interested in what they do in order to go on with it. Therefore, the demand for drama in the preschool should non be disregarded. However, the significance of drama in direction should be supported by research and by parents ‘ belief in the course of study. Therefore, a survey of the parents ‘ beliefs and attitudes towards a play-based early childhood course of study may supply information utile to instructors and decision makers when be aftering schemes for implementing a successful preschool plan.
Rationale
With the demand for effectivity, trial accomplishment tonss, and answerability, many preschool plans have adopted and reinforced formal direction, and have used drama as a recreational period instead than a learning medium. In an Oregon state-wide study sent to all kindergarten instructors and principals with first-grade instructors, Hitz and Wright ( 1998 ) found that 64 per centum of kindergarten instructors, 61 per centum of principals, and 72 per centum of first-grade instructors reported that formal academic direction was more prevailing in kindergarten than it was 10 to 20 old ages ago. In this scenario, originative look may be considered non every bit of import as cognitive development. Creativity may be viewed as irrelevant to the development of thought and job resolution. Conversely, it is possible that instructors and decision makers have adopted academic direction and other formal patterns, even though most of them considered such developmentally inappropriate. This last scenario implies the loss or deficiency of academic freedom among pedagogues, therefore beliing democratic rules.
Early on childhood pedagogues have shown concern with the type of direction used in their instruction plans. Practices used in pre-kindergarten and kindergarten categories reflected an environmentalist-behaviorist position, even though instructors reported holding other positions. From a survey of instructor pattern, Hatch and Freeman ( 1988 ) found that two-thirds of early childhood instructors were implementing plans in struggle with their doctrines refering kids ‘s acquisition. Early childhood experts have long asserted that plans for immature kids should supply for the development of societal, emotional, physical, cognitive, and originative accomplishments, but the abovementioned findings do non reflect this anymore. In short, there is a spread between research workers ‘ recommendations and instructors ‘ patterns ( Bredekamp, 1997 ; Logue, Eheart, & A ; Leavitt, 1996 ) .
Parents are the make up one’s minding authorization when it comes to the type of instruction that their kids should have. Their beliefs and attitudes towards a course of study and later their determinations are typically influenced by their ain beliefs, experiences, and attitudes. As a effect, their positions affect the execution of plans for immature kids. This survey does non corroborate that parents ‘ positions sing course of study execution are sufficient to implement a favourable plan. However, it considers their positions because they form portion of kids ‘s acquisition environment. It is of import to derive their positions about play-based instruction because aside from the instructor, they are the 1s who have entree to information sing their kids ‘s development and ability whether in school or outside it.
Motivation
As an experient primary pedagogue, and a current preschool proprietor and pedagogue, I am interested in parents ‘ beliefs and attitudes towards an early childhood play-based course of study and whether their determination to inscribe their kid in a play-based course of study is borne out of their apprehension of the plan or other factors. I personally believe in the play-based course of study and would wish to find if this attitude is shared by the parents. If they do non, I would wish to cognize the footing for their disfavor of the course of study. Parents of my pupils are informed of our play-based course of study at registration. Despite this, nevertheless, some still face me with incredulity about the course of study. As an pedagogue and concern proprietor, this survey would take me to a better apprehension of parents ‘ beliefs and attitudes approximately play as a vehicle for larning Understanding how parents understand play-based course of study is important and will add to the literature in many ways. In researching how parents understand play-based course of study this survey will lend to current literature available offering new thoughts
Contributions to the Research
Children ‘s drama has come under renewed onslaught. Inspired by my ain experiences as a preschool proprietor I hope to lend through this narrative instance survey assorted lived narratives of parents and how their beliefs and attitudes towards a play-based early childhood course of study have evolved. Since parents are the “ clients ” of early childhood plans, is it of import to understand their beliefs and attitudes.
While there is plentifulness of research back uping play-based course of studies in the early childhood schoolroom, it is largely from the pedagogues ‘ and child ‘s position point, literature is missing in this country as it pertains to the parents, their ain beliefs and attitudes. While non meant to portray generalised information the rich descriptive narratives of these five parents will stand for the larger community.
Mentality
In chapter two of this research proposal, Literature Review, I describe the context in which preschool plans, play-based course of study, and parental picks have been studied in the yesteryear, and the deductions of research findings to current pattern. . The literature reappraisal is organized from the general to the particular, which means that a general overview of preschool plans is provided, followed by a treatment of the play-based course of study, and reasoning with parents pick.
. In chapter three, Methodology, I further depict the usage of instance survey and the narrative enquiry attack to warrant the usage of such methods and design as proposed for this survey. The chapter besides provides the description of the research scene, the research sample, the informations assemblage process, information analysis, the timeline, and cogency and dependability concerns, every bit good as the awaited restrictions of the survey. The chief research inquiry every bit good as the back uping inquiries will be outlined in item as good within the chapter three.
Chapter four, Findings, will pull on common subjects that exist within the participants narratives that describe their beliefs and attitudes towards an early childhood play-based course of study. The deductions this research has on informing the preschool community will be found within chapter five, the concluding chapter, Discussions and Implications.
Keywords
Preschool Plans: refers to the pre-kindergarten plans that are geared towards fixing kids ages 2-5 old ages old for kindergarten. The plans offer assorted services for different age groups and follow different course of study theoretical accounts. In this survey, preschool plans refer to the scene and object of the research work.
Curriculum Models: refers to an educational system that combines theory with pattern. A course of study theoretical account has a theory and cognition base that reflects a philosophical orientation and is supported, in changing grades, by kid development research and educational rating. The practical application of a course of study theoretical account includes guidelines on how to put up the physical environment, construction the activities, interact with kids and their households, and support staff members in their initial preparation and on-going execution of the plan. In this survey, the theoretical account used by the preschool plan is a play-based course of study.
Play-based course of study: refers to the larning theoretical account based on developmentally appropriate drama. This theoretical account is child-centered ; it is based on kids ‘s involvement to guarantee maximized engagement, focal point, and acquisition.
Developmentally appropriate patterns: patterns that are “ designed for the age group served and implemented with attending to the demand and differences of the single kids enrolled ” ( Bredekamp, 1998 p. 53 ) . In this survey, developmentally appropriate patterns refer to the instruction patterns of kindergarten instructors as manifested in their categories.
Beliefs: refer to a set of thoughts or ideas that a individual finds of import or that influences his or her feelings, attitudes, and behaviour. Beliefs are subjective and can be measured by inquiring participants to clarify their ideas on a certain subject or issue.
Attitudes: refer to a societal concept that is predetermined by a individual ‘s beliefs. If the belief is negative, so the attitude toward the issue or job is besides negative. Attitudes are associated with stereotypes of what is socially acceptable.
Feelingss: refer to the affectional constituent of an person ‘s belief and attitude towards a certain issue or subject. Feelingss are associated with the personal experience and rating of the said issue.
Understanding/Perception: refers to the entirety of the person ‘s beliefs, attitudes, and feelings towards a certain issue or subject.

Early Childhood And Why Parents Choose Certain Schools

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Parents

My Parents Were Right

My Parents Were Right.
Narrative Writing: My Parents were right “Honey, don’t do this! Honey, don’t do that! ” Everyday, In my life I have to suffer from all that word. It’s so annoying. I am a naughty son. I love to hang out with my friends than spending time at home. Sometimes my parents not allowed me just because I must study and score a great result. But, I never listen to what they said. I do feel like they are disturbing my life. Everything I do was wrong from their eyes. Nothing is good. When they scold me, they say that they are advising me. However, I can’t accept their ways although they say the rights. Mom, next week is my birthday. Can you make some delicious cake for me with a grand birthday party for me? “, ask me. She just nodded and smile. “But dear, you must promise me to get a great result in your study, okay? ” She asked me back with a simple question but hard for me to answer. I just nodded half-heartedness. Then, I got my father in the living room. He was relaxing while reading a few newspapers. “Dad, can I borrow your motorcycle? I want to go to my friend’s house for inviting them to my party. ” “ It’s alright but remember don’t be so late. Your final exam is around the corner. “Alright, Dad. Don’t worry “, said me while rushing to get the key. My mind is only thinking about the enjoyment of the party will be. At my birthday party, I was so enjoyed with my friends. I have got many presents and birthday wishes from them. I think I am the happiest person at that time. I can see everyone is enjoying themselves so as my parents. My mouth incessantly say ‘thank you’. Well, it is blessing nurture from my parents, I admit it. “Andy, look at this. This is present from us ..,” said Dad. A huge box of presents,I really don’t know what is inside.

I look at my mom and dad, smiling. “Thank you, Mom. Thank you, Dad. ” After we gathering prayer Maghrib, Dad starting the conversation. I have smell something fishy. “Andy, If you are thinking that we are shackling you, it is not like so. We love you so much. Tomorrow, I will send you to another person that I believe more. Talaqqi and take a lot of experiences from him. Knowledge if not sought, you are nothing. Remember what I said. ” “But, Dad .. I’ve got many friends here, I really like to stay here better than there. Are you want to separate me from my own life? ” I sobbed. Separate from my own life the same as turn off my life. “Andy, soon life will be getting harder than now. Sometimes we must sacrifice now and we will get an easier life soon. Believe me. ”He calms me although I still not agreeing with him. Mom gently nodded with her gentle smile. After five years, I am working as an engineer of chemicals at well-known companies and in addition work as a professional motivator. Today, I am good at all sorts of things. I have learned besides happiness and difficulty accompanied by blessing. Now, I understand what my parents want me to be. I knew my parents were right.

My Parents Were Right

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Parents

Why Do Parents Let Their Kids Get Fat?

Why Do Parents Let Their Kids Get Fat?.
http://www. bbc. co. uk/news/magazine-19661085 Child obesity: Why do parents let their kids get fat? Obesity experts say parents are struggling with a multitude of problems when it comes to their child’s weight. They range from a lack of education about food, limited cooking skills and limited money to buy healthier food to longer working hours and marketing campaigns for junk food aimed at kids. Despite the rise in child obesity, experts say it’s wrong to just blame parents. They definitely have a responsibility, but the issue is much broader than simply blaming them,” says Paul Gately, professor of exercise and obesity at Leeds Metropolitan University. Many parents don’t realise their child is fat when it might be obvious to other people, he says. According to studies, 75% of parents underestimated the size of an overweight child, while 50% underestimated the size of an obese child.
People also judge things on what they see around them on a daily basis, Gately says. Tracey admits she let her daughter’s weight creep up because “she was no bigger than some of her friends”. From a very early age children are very good at using a “whole set of behaviours” to get what they want, say experts. It’s easy to judge but nearly every parent in the land has caved in to some sort of emotion blackmail from their child, says Gately. It just might not be about food.
Charlie Powell, campaigns director of the Children’s Food Campaign – an alliance of 150 education bodies, health groups and children’s charities – says it’s also hard for parents to stand up to the barrage of junk food advertising. A bit about food industry: There are huge hurdles they have to surmount to keep their children healthy. It’s stuff that wasn’t around in years gone by and food manufacturers are very sophisticated in the techniques they use to appeal to children. ” A bit about media: A lot of it is because the images of obesity that we see in the media are people who are massive, 30 stone (190kg) or above. This is what a lot of people think of as being overweight, but they are extreme cases. It only takes a few extra pounds to actually be overweight. ” A bit about social aspect: (bigger sizes are more tolerated bcause it’s not clear any more where is the limit of being fat; evwerybody around are bigger) “Two thirds of adults in the UK are now classified as overweight, so our perception of what we consider the average size to be has changed,” says Gately.

Why Do Parents Let Their Kids Get Fat?

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Approximately 250 words

Total price (USD) $: 10.99